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Giving

Endowment

The Bush Endowment

The endowment is an important part of the school’s overall fiscal year performance. Assistant Head for Finance and Operations Robin Bentley underscored this sharing: “Endowments are considered a hallmark of financial sustainability.” Our donors’ commitment to the endowment supports the school’s vitality and solidifies their legacy with the school. 

An endowment is considered an indicator of the financial health of an institution. Part of our role in the Development Office is to share the status of the Bush endowment, and the fund(s) they contributed. Each year, benefactors receive a financial report as well as a story, an experience or project related to their fund.

The 2019-2020 school year presented so many challengesbut also, so many successes in the ways that your and your teams overcame unprecedented circumstances. We want to share those stories with you. 

This year, we interviewed students, faculty, staff, and administrators across campus to hear more about their experiences with projects/initiatives that relate to specific funds. Learn more below about endowment fund priorities and how your fund made a difference this past year.

Thank you for visiting this page. If you have any questions, please reach out to the Bush Development Office at development@bush.edu.
 
 

Fund Priorities

List of 12 items.

  • Operations and Facilities Improvements

    Every year, the Facilities and Maintenance teams at The Bush School are charged with projects across the campus to make improvements that benefit the entire community. Funds that support the operations of the school help ensure our facilities are state-of-the art and optimal for learning.
  • Athletics

    Athletics plays an essential role in the Bush community, whether students are active participants or general supporters of the program. Dedicated coaches, most of whom are faculty members, make participation in athletics an opportunity for experiential learning in leadership. The coaching staff emphasizes fundamental technical, tactical, and emotional skills needed to succeed in interscholastic play while reinforcing positive values and social competencies such as sportsmanship, teamwork, perseverance, time-management, and ethical judgment. Participants are able to apply the outcome of these invaluable life lessons on and off the playing fields during their time at Bush and beyond. Your support of athletics ensures that all students have a chance to become leaders in and outside of the classroom.
  • Bush Methow Campus

    The Bush School is proud to extend its campus and community beyond the urban landscape of Seattle across the Cascade mountains to The Bush School Methow Campus. In the fall of 2016, the school acquired a twenty-acre campus and educational facility in Mazama, WA. This campus, located in the region known as the Methow Valley, provides students with immersive experiences. Your support of the Methow Campus supports students to experience interdependence between community, environment, and self.
  • Drama

    The Theater Program at The Bush School helps students explore many passions and skills. From deepening their performance skills to mastering technically difficult lighting designs, even people who might not see themselves as actors, performers, and directors find a place in the program at Bush. Support of drama at Bush ensures that students can practice their talents in person and virtually.
  • Faculty Compensation and Professional Development

    The founder of The Bush School Helen Taylor Bush believed that the most sacred resource at a school is the teacher, because of their ability to guide experiential learning and transform students lives. The endowment supports Bush’s ability to not only support our faculty with leadership from Sally Maxwell, but also to offer competitive salaries to bring and keep talented educators in our community.
  • Financial Aid

    Support of Financial Aid at the Bush School means we are able to invite a more diverse and talented group of students to attend the school, regardless of their financial situation. Financial Aid makes Bush a more vibrant community.
  • Head of School Priorities and Strategic Initiatives

    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular and operational priorities for the school. Enacting these priorities would not be possible without donor support.
  • Music

    The Music Program in each division at The Bush School, promotes intentional creating and keen listening; it celebrates music as an emotional outlet and empowering expressive form; and it balances music literacy, performance and ensemble experience, and explorative learning. Your support of the Music Program ensure that faculty have the support they need to provide a robust program for students.
  • New courses/Multidisciplinary or Divisional Collaboration

    Supporting teachers to create innovative curricular ensure that students at The Bush School will receive a cutting edge educational experience. From Wilderness Programs to engineering courses, providing resources to faculty for professional development increases their ability to approach their teaching creatively and collaboratively.
  • Student Leadership

    Supporting student leadership at The Bush School is foundational to the school that is mission driven and student led. Different programming opportunities from student clubs, to athletics, to mentorship, at The Bush School allows students to build upon their leadership and management skills. 
  • Technology and Innovation

    The Bush School's technology, library, and media literacy curriculum supports the mission and foundations of The Bush School by working closely with all students to support technical creativity, basic literacies, and information fluency. Your support of technology and innovation ensures that the school can continue to create a place where exception teaching can occur online and in person.
  • Wilderness Programs

    Students learn most effectively from direct experience, taking risks, actively participating, and holding authentic responsibility for outcomes. Wilderness and International Programs at The Bush School engages students in every aspect of experiential education, and support the these programs allows the school to continue to offer a wide array of opportunities for students to learn and grow in nature and abroad.
 
 

Endowment Funds

List of 33 items.

  • Alan Turing Endowment for Computer Science Instruction

    Gabe Newell and Lisa Mennet, and their children Gray Newell ’16 and Luc Mennet ’18, established the Alan Turing Endowment for Computer Science Instruction in 2013 to provide funding for computer programming courses in the Upper School. Over time, and as technology evolves, the specific use of the fund may change to support instruction in new and emerging areas in the disciplines of computer science and technology.
    Q&A with Grace Hayek, Upper School Science Department Co-Chair and Teacher

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    This is my 5th year at Bush

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Upper School Science in the last school year?
    One meaningful moment that comes to mind is when we invited the photography class to come do a gallery walk at the end of Unit 2. The gallery included  designed pinhole cameras and photographs that were taken and developed in our makeshift darkroom on campus. It was so wonderful to see the engineering students share their working prototypes and explain the choices they made for each aspect of their design. At the same time, it was remarkable to see the photography students share their own connected experiences with a film camera. That moment sticks in my mind because of the pride I saw in the engineering students and the spark of confidence that they could indeed become designers or engineers in the future.

    What was the biggest expense for Upper School Science in 2019-2020?
    The biggest expense was getting all the new materials and tools. Even though we only launched Engineer Your World: Engineering Design and Analysis (EYW) with sixteen students, the amount of supplies required several months of preparation. The materials ranged from stationary (post its, markers, tape, paperclips, etc.) to actual tools (utility knives, screwdrivers, drills, measuring tapes, etc.) to consumables (cardboard, foam core, balsa wood etc.) to technology equipment (Arduino kits, earthquake simulation shaker tables, laser cutter, 3D printers etc.) Moreover, we had to work with facilities on installing new cabinets and bookshelves in the science classrooms to accommodate the new items, along with maintaining enough space for ongoing student projects.

    What inspired you about your work in Upper School Science last year? 
    It was particularly inspiring to see the students engaging with Pensar Engineers (an engineering company who came to visit our class), and recognizing that what they were doing in EYW is very similar to what these professionals do on a daily basis. After this visit, it was incredible to see the way the students embraced the design process and grew comfortable with failing forward.

    EYW has quickly become one of my all time favorite courses to teach. Everyday was a learning experience for me as I saw students innovate, take risks, and come up with brilliant design ideas. I really feel the class is student-led and as a teacher I am there as a guide to give them tools and support whenever they hit a roadblock. This concept of students feeling the need for learning a scientific concept or a mathematical concept allowed for genuine cross curricular learning and engagement.

    Creating the EYW course was a lot of work and I am glad it paid off. In addition to the two-week training I had to do at the University of Austin in Texas, we had months of work planning the new layout of the science classes, ordering equipment, and setting up the equipment in a way where students could find everything easily and keep it all organized. I could not have done it without Caroline Waltmire, our Upper School Science Lab Tech.
  • Build Bush Phase 2 Faculty Endowment Fund

    In 2001, The Bush School and The Board of Trustees embarked on an ambitious fundraising campaign and raised philanthropic support for new facilities, the endowment, enhanced programs, and other proper Board-designated purposes.
    Head of School Priorities: Dr. Percy L. Abram

    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2019-2020 school year, we focused on three areas in particular: civics education, supporting student affinity groups, and technology pedagogy. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. These priorities, and so many others, would not be possible without donor support.

    Civics Education:
    This year, History Day was one of the last Upper School events that took place prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and subsequent school closures issued by Governor Jay Inslee. On March 4, Nancy Bowman, Upper School Civic Teacher, organized History Day, inviting members of the broader Seattle community to explore local and regional history, issues of social justice, and avenues for civic engagement.

    Fifty-minute sessions were held on the Upper School campus, and the keynote address was delivered in Schuchart Gym by Superior Court Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court. The robust line-up of speakers included experts in their respective fields of law, policy, and community organizing:

    History offerings
    • Stephanie Johnson-Toliver from the Black Heritage Society on Black history in Washington State
    • Nina Wallace and Caitlin Oiye from Densho on Japanese American internment and how the Japanese community (and other marginalized/oppressed communities) can and should tell their stories and determine the historical narrative
    • Cori Tingstad ’14 on redlining and segregation in Seattle, past and present
    • Rahul Gupta from the Wing Luke Museum–on the 1886 Chinese Riots
    Social Justice offerings
    • Tiffany Lamoreaux of Solid Ground on anti-racism
    • Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court on the decriminalization of mental illness
    Political/Governance/Civic Engagement offerings
    • Austin Jenkins, political reporter out of Olympia for local NPR stations
    • Lisa Ayrault of FairVote Washington about the merits and drive for ranked choice voting here and across the nation
    • Common Purpose, dedicated to ending voter suppression and ensuring voter rights and participation
    • Osta Davis ’09 part of the Democratic Campaign Committee in the Washington State House
    • Omar Cuevas Vega of the State Poverty Action Network, storytelling for advocacy
    In a year ripe for political engagement, History Day illuminated the diverse ways in which students can be civically engaged and effect positive social changes in their local communities.

    Supporting Student Affinity Groups:
    Another way that our students build community is through clubs and affinity groups. Clubs are largely defined as interest groups: anyone with an interest in a theme or activity can participate. Affinity groups are spaces where participants must all share an identity that connects them.

    In the Upper School, there are more than forty student-led clubs and affinity groups focused on issues of human rights and exploring racial identity.

    The Bush School is proud to be mission-driven and student-led. I am especially proud of the work of Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW) this year. With the recent increase of conversations around anti-racism and white identity, Upper School students wanted to re-imagine their anti-racist group from White Students Combatting Racism to Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW). Two students, Celia and Louise, recently put together a letter to the Upper School with this information. In their words, here is what BUW is and how it has evolved:

    What is BUW?
    BUW is a space for white people to educate ourselves about whiteness as an identity and culture rather than a societal default. The burden of the education of white people has fallen on people of color for far too long, and our goal is to help Bush students and faculty dig into our own whiteness and the feelings that come with it. We work hard to maintain a sense of transparency and accountability by keeping public notes of our meetings and collaborating with race-based affinity groups and qualified professionals (people of color paid to do race work).

    How has BUW evolved?
    Two years ago, we decided Bush’s previous anti-racist group, White Students Combatting Racism (WSCR), was not serving the community, so we got to work on how to improve it. We sent out forms to the student body and got feedback about how the group had functioned in the past. Many students voiced concerns about an all-white space, as well as worry that WSCR had “white savior” motives, since racial progress has never been spearheaded by white people and the dismantling of racist systems cannot be done by white people alone. After hearing how people felt, we made some changes. First, after a four-month process of in-depth conversation, research, and reflection, we found a new name that we thought better suited our motives: Blazers Understanding Whiteness. We also changed our mission and focus to better fit the role of white community members and the needs of The Bush School.

    The student and adult catalysts working on these issues now and in the decades prior have created a true learning environment, improving their practices to best support their peers. This affinity group continued to meet, even through remote schooling.

    Technology Pedagogy: 
    The ability for students to meet, for classes to continue, and for teachers to troubleshoot, largely depends on our incredible Technology team, led by Director Ethan Delavan.

    Earlier this year, Ethan spoke about the importance of technology as a measurement of literacy in our society today. Especially during this exceptional time, technology has provided a platform to connect, learn, perform, and practice safely.

    “Technology really is now where literacy was maybe 200 years ago, where all of a sudden it's become something that's really important for all of us to know at some level and have some real competencies in technology. And it is the basis of human interaction in a globalized society.”

    Some technology performs better depending on the need of the user. Part of the challenge for the Bush Tech team is not only the increase in need, but the increase in expertise on the numerous platforms that exist for educators today.

    In addition to actual learning content, Bush teachers needed to recreate an environment that was comfortable for learning. Social emotional learning can help build that environment, even in a virtual classroom, by creating connections and community. The way technology and support was leveraged to empower our community is inspiring. Additionally, Ethan spoke to the ways that their team, teachers, and staff, address some of these challenges by asking a lot of questions.

    “It’s not that each teacher needed to come to the same answer. Each teacher came to a lot of different answers. And the way you do a physical education class might be really different than the way you do a biology class at a distance. But if you start asking those same questions about student experience, you tend to really deepen the kind of learning that happens remotely and still maintain a really experiential focus for students.”

    In the years ahead, technology will continue to be an important aspect in creating a rich learning environment for our students. As Ethan shared, and as our school community has demonstrated, technology extends far beyond the physical laptops, cords, and routers; there is a strategic pedagogy that under girds our effort to educate our students and support our faculty.

    From technology pedagogy, supporting student affinity groups, and engaging civics education curriculum, our entire community grew from these innovative experiences. Your support of the endowment and strategic priorities ensures that our school continues to thrive, no matter how difficult the circumstances. This past year has shown us that we are stronger when we collaborate and imagine together, and this is made possible by commitment of philanthropy to The Bush School.
  • Celebrate Bush Faculty Compensation Endowment Fund

    In March 2002, contributions to the Fund-an-Item at Celebrate Bush: The Art of Teaching made by parents, faculty, staff, alumni, and other friends established a permanently restricted endowment to support the compensation of Bush teachers. Income from the Celebrate Bush Faculty Compensation Fund provides support for faculty salaries.
    Q&A with Bushra Jawed - First Grade Teacher

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    I’ve been at Bush for 2 years - I started in Fall 2018.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to professional development in the last school year?
    I think one of the biggest takeaways from this summer in terms of professional development was taking the Lucy Calkins Writers Workshop based out of New York. Because of COVID-19, it became a virtual workshop on Zoom, and a broader group of people could participate in the class. It became more accessible, and they treated the workshop as though we were together in a regular classroom. They also asked us to consider various scenarios, such as a hybrid model, an unexpected return to fully remote schooling, etc. 

    Participating in the Writers Workshop Teachers College Professional Development was very helpful because the content was presented as if we were back in a regular classroom. They also talked through questions like: what would happen if all of your students were doing remote learning? What about if you have some students in class and some doing a hybrid model? What if you have some students who are on campus a few days and then off campus? How do we manage to be authentic or true to this Writers Workshop program in a way that is different from the schedule and yet find enough time to complete all the steps laid out in the program? I was really appreciative of that experience.

    What inspired you about Bush’s Professional Development Program?
    It's been incredibly inspiring that Bush provides Professional Development for its teachers and it speaks volumes to how much the community values its faculty. I was able to put many of those strategies and techniques that we used in the writers workshop into practice right away when we began the school year this fall. Working for a school that allows us to attend workshops and really focus on growing our skills as educators encourages us to learn and grow in the same way we want our students to learn and grow. 

    Additional comments
    A silver lining in all of this is the support that we as a Lower School team have for each other.
  • Class of 1965 Memorial Fund

    This endowed fund was established in 2006 by the members of the Helen Bush School Class of 1965 to honor and memorialize the class and its members. The Class of 1965 Memorial Fund provides support for faculty enrichment opportunities. (1) Monies will be made available for faculty enrichment every year based on the formula described in the school’s endowment spending policy. (2) The exact use of the available funds will be determined by the Director of Finance and Operations working in conjunction with the Head of School. (3) The members of the Class of 1965 will receive a report from the Development Office each year detailing the fund’s earnings and use.
    Q&A with Bushra Jawed - First Grade Teacher

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    I’ve been at Bush for 2 years - I started in Fall 2018.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to professional development in the last school year?
    I think one of the biggest takeaways from this summer in terms of professional development was taking the Lucy Calkins Writers Workshop based out of New York. Because of COVID-19, it became a virtual workshop on Zoom, and a broader group of people could participate in the class. It became more accessible, and they treated the workshop as though we were together in a regular classroom. They also asked us to consider various scenarios, such as a hybrid model, an unexpected return to fully remote schooling, etc. 

    Participating in the Writers Workshop Teachers College Professional Development was very helpful because the content was presented as if we were back in a regular classroom. They also talked through questions like: what would happen if all of your students were doing remote learning? What about if you have some students in class and some doing a hybrid model? What if you have some students who are on campus a few days and then off campus? How do we manage to be authentic or true to this Writers Workshop program in a way that is different from the schedule and yet find enough time to complete all the steps laid out in the program? I was really appreciative of that experience.

    What inspired you about Bush’s Professional Development Program?
    It's been incredibly inspiring that Bush provides Professional Development for its teachers and it speaks volumes to how much the community values its faculty. I was able to put many of those strategies and techniques that we used in the writers workshop into practice right away when we began the school year this fall. Working for a school that allows us to attend workshops and really focus on growing our skills as educators encourages us to learn and grow in the same way we want our students to learn and grow. 

    Additional comments
    A silver lining in all of this is the support that we as a Lower School team have for each other. 
  • Endowment for Athletic Excellence

    This fund was jointly established in 2008 by The Bush School and anonymous founding donors. The Endowment for Athletic Excellence provides the athletic department with additional resources to support its programs.
    Q&A with Jo Ito, Athletics Director

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    7 years

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Athletics in the last school year?
    The Bush School was recognized with the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Safe Sports School award for its athletic program. The award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that have met the recommended standards to improve safety in sports. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention, and treatment.

     “We are honored to receive this recognition from NATA,” said Director of Athletics, Jo Ito. “We remain committed to keeping our student-athletes safe during team practices and games so they can accomplish their own goals of great competition, winning records, fair sportsmanship, and good health. Our goal is to lead our athletics program to the highest safety standards for our players. A huge thank you goes to our Athletic Trainer, Grace Katt. She played a vital role in establishing a long list of safety and health procedures which have put us in a position to be considered for this prestigious award.”

    What was the biggest expense for Athletics in 2019-2020?
    New uniforms for both Varsity Cross Country and Track & Field, various equipment for Cross Country Skiing, coaching stipends, and field rentals.

    What inspired you about your work in Athletics last year?
    Adjusting to the circumstances with the pandemic last spring season was certainly challenging.  I was great to see the athletics staff rally to pull off successful virtual recognition events for both the Middle School and the Upper School, as well as launch a social media campaign to celebrate the senior athletes. Witnessing our department's willingness to pivot, to be flexible and creative, and to come through in support of our student-athletes was truly inspiring.
  • Faye Frederick Padelford Fund

    Philip S. Padelford established this unrestricted fund in 1993 in memory of his first wife, Fay Frederick Padelford, a mother of four Bush alumnae and a member of the Board of Trustees for many years. This endowment honors her deep involvement in the life of The Bush School and is made possible by contributions from Philip and other members of the Padelford family. Income from the fund is used at the Head of School’s discretion to support the areas of greatest need at The Bush School.
    Head of School Priorities: Dr. Percy L. Abram

    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2019-2020 school year, we focused on three areas in particular: civics education, supporting student affinity groups, and technology pedagogy. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. These priorities, and so many others, would not be possible without donor support.

    Civics Education:
    This year, History Day was one of the last Upper School events that took place prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and subsequent school closures issued by Governor Jay Inslee. On March 4, Nancy Bowman, Upper School Civics Teacher, organized History Day, inviting members of the broader Seattle community to explore local and regional history, issues of social justice, and avenues for civic engagement.

    Fifty-minute sessions were held on the Upper School campus, and the keynote address was delivered in Schuchart Gym by Superior Court Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court. The robust line-up of speakers included experts in their respective fields of law, policy, and community organizing:

    History offerings
    • Stephanie Johnson-Toliver from the Black Heritage Society on Black history in Washington State
    • Nina Wallace and Caitlin Oiye from Densho on Japanese American internment and how the Japanese community (and other marginalized/oppressed communities) can and should tell their stories and determine the historical narrative
    • Cori Tingstad ’14 on redlining and segregation in Seattle, past and present
    • Rahul Gupta from the Wing Luke Museum–on the 1886 Chinese Riots
    Social Justice offerings
    • Tiffany Lamoreaux of Solid Ground on anti-racism
    • Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court on the decriminalization of mental illness
    Political/Governance/Civic Engagement offerings
    • Austin Jenkins, political reporter out of Olympia for local NPR stations
    • Lisa Ayrault of FairVote Washington about the merits and drive for ranked choice voting here and across the nation
    • Common Purpose, dedicated to ending voter suppression and ensuring voter rights and participation
    • Osta Davis ’09 part of the Democratic Campaign Committee in the Washington State House
    • Omar Cuevas Vega of the State Poverty Action Network, storytelling for advocacy
    In a year ripe for political engagement, History Day illuminated the diverse ways in which students can be civically engaged and effect positive social changes in their local communities.

    Supporting Student Affinity Groups:
    Another way that our students build community is through clubs and affinity groups. Clubs are largely defined as interest groups: anyone with an interest in a theme or activity can participate. Affinity groups are spaces where participants must all share an identity that connects them.

    In the Upper School, there are more than forty student-led clubs and affinity groups focused on issues of human rights and exploring racial identity.

    The Bush School is proud to be mission-driven and student-led. I am especially proud of the work of Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW) this year. With the recent increase of conversations around anti-racism and white identity, Upper School students wanted to re-imagine their anti-racist group from White Students Combatting Racism to Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW). Two students, Celia and Louise, recently put together a letter to the Upper School with this information. In their words, here is what BUW is and how it has evolved:

    What is BUW?
    BUW is a space for white people to educate ourselves about whiteness as an identity and culture rather than a societal default. The burden of the education of white people has fallen on people of color for far too long, and our goal is to help Bush students and faculty dig into our own whiteness and the feelings that come with it. We work hard to maintain a sense of transparency and accountability by keeping public notes of our meetings and collaborating with race-based affinity groups and qualified professionals (people of color paid to do race work).

    How has BUW evolved?
    Two years ago, we decided Bush’s previous anti-racist group, White Students Combatting Racism (WSCR), was not serving the community, so we got to work on how to improve it. We sent out forms to the student body and got feedback about how the group had functioned in the past. Many students voiced concerns about an all-white space, as well as worry that WSCR had “white savior” motives, since racial progress has never been spearheaded by white people and the dismantling of racist systems cannot be done by white people alone. After hearing how people felt, we made some changes. First, after a four-month process of in-depth conversation, research, and reflection, we found a new name that we thought better suited our motives: Blazers Understanding Whiteness. We also changed our mission and focus to better fit the role of white community members and the needs of The Bush School.

    The student and adult catalysts working on these issues now and in the decades prior have created a true learning environment, improving their practices to best support their peers. This affinity group continued to meet, even through remote schooling.

    Technology Pedagogy: 
    The ability for students to meet, for classes to continue, and for teachers to troubleshoot, largely depends on our incredible Technology team, led by Director Ethan Delavan.

    Earlier this year, Ethan spoke about the importance of technology as a measurement of literacy in our society today. Especially during this exceptional time, technology has provided a platform to connect, learn, perform, and practice safely.

    “Technology really is now where literacy was maybe 200 years ago, where all of a sudden it's become something that's really important for all of us to know at some level and have some real competencies in technology. And it is the basis of human interaction in a globalized society.”

    Some technology performs better depending on the need of the user. Part of the challenge for the Bush Tech team is not only the increase in need, but the increase in expertise on the numerous platforms that exist for educators today.

    In addition to actual learning content, Bush teachers needed to recreate an environment that was comfortable for learning. Social emotional learning can help build that environment, even in a virtual classroom, by creating connections and community. The way technology and support was leveraged to empower our community is inspiring. Additionally, Ethan spoke to the ways that their team, teachers, and staff, address some of these challenges by asking a lot of questions.

    “It’s not that each teacher needed to come to the same answer. Each teacher came to a lot of different answers. And the way you do a physical education class might be really different than the way you do a biology class at a distance. But if you start asking those same questions about student experience, you tend to really deepen the kind of learning that happens remotely and still maintain a really experiential focus for students.”

    In the years ahead, technology will continue to be an important aspect in creating a rich learning environment for our students. As Ethan shared, and as our school community has demonstrated, technology extends far beyond the physical laptops, cords, and routers; there is a strategic pedagogy that undergirds our effort to educate our students and support our faculty.

    From technology pedagogy, supporting student affinity groups, and engaging civics education curriculum, our entire community grew from these innovative experiences. Your support of the endowment and strategic priorities ensures that our school continues to thrive, no matter how difficult the circumstances. This past year has shown us that we are stronger when we collaborate and imagine together, and this is made possible by commitment of philanthropy to The Bush School.
  • Financial Aid Fund

    The Financial Aid Fund was established in 2015. The generous contributions to the Financial Aid Fund are permanently restricted to support student financial aid at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Fred A. Dust Technology Fund

    The permanently restricted Fred A. Dust Technology Fund was established in 1996 in recognition of Fred Dust’s significant contribution to the development and integration of technology in the educational program at Bush during his tenure as Head of School (1987 to 1996). Income from this fund supports technology projects.
    Q&A with Tracy Asplen, Middle School Technology Teacher

    How many years have you worked at Bush?
    This is my second year. 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Middle School Technology in the last school year?
    When we went to remote school last spring, I was in a unique situation because I had all 180+ middle school students at the same time. I decided to engage them in a Design Thinking "sprint" to come up with solutions to real world problems using technology. I surveyed students about their interests, divided them into teams, and engaged them in "how might we..." questions. These questions ranged from making grocery shopping safer to developing new hobbies. Students researched, came up with conclusions, and created prototypes to answer the questions. Results included cookbooks, games, and Kahoots, just to name a few. The entire process was supervised by me using SprintBase, an online "sprint" facilitation website. I worked closely with the company, and they even ended up writing an article on their website about my project.

    What inspired you about your work in Middle School Technology last year?
    I really wanted students to know that their ideas and opinions mattered.

    What was the biggest expense for Middle School Technology in 2019-2020?
    My project was free, but I know that many students needed tech support for remote school, including devices, routers, etc. As a department, we explored options for creating online galleries of student work, but they were cost prohibitive at the time. Thankfully, this year I was able to purchase Microbit kits for every middle school student. Using these devices, we are able to focus our attention on coding.
  • Fund for Socio-Economic Diversity

    The permanently restricted Fund for Socio-Economic Diversity was established in 1996 by friends of The Bush School to support financial aid for students from middle-income families.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Gardner Nettleton LeCorcq Endowment Fund

    Martha Nettleton Gardner ’36 and her sister, Jane Nettleton LeCocq, established this permanently restricted fund in 1971 to provide scholarship grants. Income from the fund supports financial aid for students selected by the Head of School or a committee appointed by them.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • General Endowment

    The School began an ambitious capital campaign in 1997, a portion of which went to this general endowment fund. The income generated from the General Endowment is unrestricted as to purpose.
    Head of School Priorities: Dr. Percy L. Abram

    Each year, unrestricted support helps provide funding for priorities set by the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team. In the 2019-2020 school year, we focused on three areas in particular: civics education, supporting student affinity groups, and technology pedagogy. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. These priorities, and so many others, would not be possible without donor support.

    Civics Education:
    This year, History Day was one of the last Upper School events that took place prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and subsequent school closures issued by Governor Jay Inslee. On March 4, Nancy Bowman, Upper School Civic Teacher, organized History Day, inviting members of the broader Seattle community to explore local and regional history, issues of social justice, and avenues for civic engagement.

    Fifty-minute sessions were held on the Upper School campus, and the keynote address was delivered in Schuchart Gym by Superior Court Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court. The robust line-up of speakers included experts in their respective fields of law, policy, and community organizing:

    History offerings
    • Stephanie Johnson-Toliver from the Black Heritage Society on Black history in Washington State
    • Nina Wallace and Caitlin Oiye from Densho on Japanese American internment and how the Japanese community (and other marginalized/oppressed communities) can and should tell their stories and determine the historical narrative
    • Cori Tingstad ’14 on redlining and segregation in Seattle, past and present
    • Rahul Gupta from the Wing Luke Museum–on the 1886 Chinese Riots
    Social Justice offerings
    • Tiffany Lamoreaux of Solid Ground on anti-racism
    • Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court on the decriminalization of mental illness
    Political/Governance/Civic Engagement offerings
    • Austin Jenkins, political reporter out of Olympia for local NPR stations
    • Lisa Ayrault of FairVote Washington about the merits and drive for ranked choice voting here and across the nation
    • Common Purpose, dedicated to ending voter suppression and ensuring voter rights and participation
    • Osta Davis ’09 part of the Democratic Campaign Committee in the Washington State House
    • Omar Cuevas Vega of the State Poverty Action Network, storytelling for advocacy
    In a year ripe for political engagement, History Day illuminated the diverse ways in which students can be civically engaged and effect positive social changes in their local communities.

    Supporting Student Affinity Groups:

    Another way that our students build community is through clubs and affinity groups. Clubs are largely defined as interest groups: anyone with an interest in a theme or activity can participate. Affinity groups are spaces where participants must all share an identity that connects them.

    In the Upper School, there are more than forty student-led clubs and affinity groups focused on issues of human rights and exploring racial identity.

    The Bush School is proud to be mission-driven and student-led. I am especially proud of the work of Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW) this year. With the recent increase of conversations around anti-racism and white identity, Upper School students wanted to re-imagine their anti-racist group from White Students Combatting Racism to Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW). Two students, Celia and Louise, recently put together a letter to the Upper School with this information. In their words, here is what BUW is and how it has evolved:

    What is BUW?
    BUW is a space for white people to educate ourselves about whiteness as an identity and culture rather than a societal default. The burden of the education of white people has fallen on people of color for far too long, and our goal is to help Bush students and faculty dig into our own whiteness and the feelings that come with it. We work hard to maintain a sense of transparency and accountability by keeping public notes of our meetings and collaborating with race-based affinity groups and qualified professionals (people of color paid to do race work).

    How has BUW evolved?
    Two years ago, we decided Bush’s previous anti-racist group, White Students Combatting Racism (WSCR), was not serving the community, so we got to work on how to improve it. We sent out forms to the student body and got feedback about how the group had functioned in the past. Many students voiced concerns about an all-white space, as well as worry that WSCR had “white savior” motives, since racial progress has never been spearheaded by white people and the dismantling of racist systems cannot be done by white people alone. After hearing how people felt, we made some changes. First, after a four-month process of in-depth conversation, research, and reflection, we found a new name that we thought better suited our motives: Blazers Understanding Whiteness. We also changed our mission and focus to better fit the role of white community members and the needs of The Bush School.

    The student and adult catalysts working on these issues now and in the decades prior have created a true learning environment, improving their practices to best support their peers. This affinity group continued to meet, even through remote schooling.

    Technology Pedagogy 

    The ability for students to meet, for classes to continue, and for teachers to troubleshoot, largely depends on our incredible Technology team, led by Director Ethan Delavan.

    Earlier this year, Ethan spoke about the importance of technology as a measurement of literacy in our society today. Especially during this exceptional time, technology has provided a platform to connect, learn, perform, and practice safely.

    “Technology really is now where literacy was maybe 200 years ago, where all of a sudden it's become something that's really important for all of us to know at some level and have some real competencies in technology. And it is the basis of human interaction in a globalized society.”

    Some technology performs better depending on the need of the user. Part of the challenge for the Bush Tech team is not only the increase in need, but the increase in expertise on the numerous platforms that exist for educators today.

    In addition to actual learning content, Bush teachers needed to recreate an environment that was comfortable for learning. Social emotional learning can help build that environment, even in a virtual classroom, by creating connections and community. The way technology and support was leveraged to empower our community is inspiring. Additionally, Ethan spoke to the ways that their team, teachers, and staff, address some of these challenges by asking a lot of questions.

    “It’s not that each teacher needed to come to the same answer. Each teacher came to a lot of different answers. And the way you do a physical education class might be really different than the way you do a biology class at a distance. But if you start asking those same questions about student experience, you tend to really deepen the kind of learning that happens remotely and still maintain a really experiential focus for students.”

    In the years ahead, technology will continue to be an important aspect in creating a rich learning environment for our students. As Ethan shared, and as our school community has demonstrated, technology extends far beyond the physical laptops, cords, and routers; there is a strategic pedagogy that undergirds our effort to educate our students and support our faculty.

    From technology pedagogy, supporting student affinity groups, and engaging civics education curriculum, our entire community grew from these innovative experiences. Your support of the endowment and strategic priorities ensures that our school continues to thrive, no matter how difficult the circumstances. This past year has shown us that we are stronger when we collaborate and imagine together, and this is made possible by commitment of philanthropy to The Bush School.
  • George W. Taylor Faculty Endowment Fund

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 1977 in memory of George W. Taylor, who taught at The Bush School from 1972-1976. The fund honors George W. Taylor, a much admired faculty member, whose name has become synonymous with excellence in teaching in the Bush community, and it acknowledges the invaluable contributions of Bush teachers today by providing support for faculty sabbaticals.
    Due to COVID-19, The Bush School did not offer faculty sabbatical in the 2019-2020 school year. Pending an improvement to public health and stabilization of school operations, the sabbatical program will return to interested faculty.

    This year, we interviewed students, faculty, staff, and administrators across campus to hear more about their experiences with projects and initiatives that relate to specific funds. Though the George Taylor Sabbatical did not occur this year, we hope you enjoy the story below of how one faculty member was supported through professional development. 

    Bushra Jawed - First Grade Teacher

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    I’ve been at Bush for 2 years - I started in Fall 2018.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to professional development in the last school year?
    I think one of the biggest takeaways from this summer in terms of professional development was taking the Lucy Calkins Writers Workshop based out of New York. Because of COVID-19, it became a virtual workshop on Zoom, and a broader group of people could participate in the class. It became more accessible, and they treated the workshop as though we were together in a regular classroom. They also asked us to consider various scenarios, such as a hybrid model, an unexpected return to fully remote schooling, etc. 

    Participating in the Writers Workshop Teachers College Professional Development was very helpful because the content was presented as if we would be back in a regular classroom. They also talked through questions like: what would happen if all of your students were doing remote learning? What about if you have some students in class and some doing a hybrid model? What if you have some students who are on campus a few days and then off campus? How do we manage to be authentic or true to this Writers Workshop program in a way that is different from the schedule and yet find enough time to complete all the steps laid out in the program? I was really appreciative of that experience.

    What inspired you about Bush’s Professional Development Program?
    It's been incredibly inspiring that Bush provides Professional Development for its teachers and it speaks volumes to how much the community values its faculty. I was able to put many of those strategies and techniques that we used in the writers workshop into practice right away when we began the school year this fall. Working for a school that allows us to attend workshops and really focus on growing our skills as educators encourages us to learn and grow in the same way we want our students to learn and grow. 

    Additional comments
    A silver lining in all of this is the support that we as a Lower School team have for each other.
  • Gerlich Fund for Faculty Salaries

    The Gerlich Fund for Faculty Salaries was created in 1999 through the gifts of Katharyn A. Gerlich to support the compensation of Bush teachers. Income from this permanently restricted fund is used to provide funding for faculty salaries.
    Q&A with Bushra Jawed, First Grade Teacher

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    I’ve been at Bush for 2 years - I started in Fall 2018.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to professional development in the last school year?
    I think one of the biggest takeaways from this summer in terms of professional development was taking the Lucy Calkins Writers Workshop based out of New York. Because of COVID-19, it became a virtual workshop on Zoom, and a broader group of people could participate in the class. It became more accessible, and they treated the workshop as though we were together in a regular classroom. They also asked us to consider various scenarios, such as a hybrid model, an unexpected return to fully remote schooling, etc. 

    Participating in the Writers Workshop Teachers College Professional Development was very helpful because the content was presented as if we were back in a regular classroom. They also talked through questions like: what would happen if all of your students were doing remote learning? What about if you have some students in class and some doing a hybrid model? What if you have some students who are on campus a few days and then off campus? How do we manage to be authentic or true to this Writers Workshop program in a way that is different from the schedule and yet find enough time to complete all the steps laid out in the program? I was really appreciative of that experience.


    What inspired you about Bush’s Professional Development Program?
    It's been incredibly inspiring that Bush provides Professional Development for its teachers and it speaks volumes to how much the community values its faculty. I was able to put many of those strategies and techniques that we used in the writers workshop into practice right away when we began the school year this fall. Working for a school that allows us to attend workshops and really focus on growing our skills as educators encourages us to learn and grow in the same way we want our students to learn and grow. 

    Additional comments
    A silver lining in all of this is the support that we as a Lower School team have for each other. 
  • Goldmark Memorial Fund

    The Goldmark Memorial Fund was established in the months following the Goldmark family’s tragic death in 1985 in memory of Chuck, Annie, Derek ’92, and Colin ’94 Goldmark. The income from this permanently restricted fund supports student financial aid.
    Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Jeri Lee Cunningham '71 Endowed Scholarship Fund for the Performing Arts

    The Jeri Lee Cunningham '71 Endowed Scholarship Fund for the Performing Arts was established in honor of Jeri Lee Cunningham ’71 who attended Bush from seventh to twelfth grade and passed away before the age of nineteen. Jeri was active in the Bush school community, especially in the performing arts. The fund is intended to provide financial support and give preference to those students who demonstrate a verified need for financial assistance and an interest and ability in one or all of the following in order of preference - ice-skating, dance, or music.
    Q&A with Julia Sarewitz, Lower School Music Director and Performing Arts Chair

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2017, three years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Lower School Music in the last school year?
    I was teaching Fifth Grade about the 12-bar Blues progression and improvisation. One student at a time would improvise on the xylophone while everyone else played the progression on their instrument of choice. I had one student who was shy about his musicality and, after some healthy encouragement from his peers, he decided to give it a go. This musically-shy student performed the most incredible, energetic, bluesy solo any of us had heard! The entire classroom erupted in cheers and hoots and hollers afterwards - it was one of those goosebumps, never forget it classroom moments!

    What was the biggest expense for Lower School Music in 2019-2020?
    Purchasing ukuleles for the music classroom. It is incredible how much they have inspired kids and expanded what we do and learn about in music!

    What inspired you about your work in Lower School Music last year? 
    The students! They are such creative and curious people. Seeing them light up about learning a new song, dance, or instrument fuels me to continue to deepen my approach to teaching music.
  • Julie Henke Dahlgren ’54 Endowment for Leadership

    Established by Donald Dahlgren and his children in 2011 to honor Julie's role as a student leader at Bush in an effort to prepare Bush students to take leadership roles in making the world a better place after they graduate.
    2019-2020 | Student Leadership

    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. Student leadership is always a focus. These priorities, and so many others, would not be possible without your donor support.

    Supporting Student Affinity Groups

    Another way that our students build community is through clubs and affinity groups. Clubs are largely defined as interest groups: anyone with an interest in a theme or activity can participate. Affinity groups are spaces where participants must all share an identity that connects them.

    In the Upper School, there are more than forty student-led clubs and affinity groups focused on issues of human rights and exploring racial identity.

    The Bush School is proud to be mission-driven and student-led. I am especially proud of the work of Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW) this year. With the recent increase of conversations around anti-racism and white identity, Upper School students wanted to re-imagine their anti-racist group from White Students Combatting Racism to Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW). Two students, Celia and Louise, recently put together a letter to the Upper School with this information. In their words, here is what BUW is and how it has evolved:

    What is BUW?
    BUW is a space for white people to educate ourselves about whiteness as an identity and culture rather than a societal default. The burden of the education of white people has fallen on people of color for far too long, and our goal is to help Bush students and faculty dig into our own whiteness and the feelings that come with it. We work hard to maintain a sense of transparency and accountability by keeping public notes of our meetings and collaborating with race-based affinity groups and qualified professionals (people of color paid to do race work).

    How has BUW evolved?

    Two years ago, we decided Bush’s previous anti-racist group, White Students Combatting Racism (WSCR), was not serving the community, so we got to work on how to improve it. We sent out forms to the student body and got feedback about how the group had functioned in the past. Many students voiced concerns about an all-white space, as well as worry that WSCR had “white savior” motives, since racial progress has never been spearheaded by white people and the dismantling of racist systems cannot be done by white people alone. After hearing how people felt, we made some changes. First, after a four-month process of in-depth conversation, research, and reflection, we found a new name that we thought better suited our motives: Blazers Understanding Whiteness. We also changed our mission and focus to better fit the role of white community members and the needs of The Bush School.

    The student and adult catalysts working on these issues now and in the decades prior have created a true learning environment, improving their practices to best support their peers. This affinity group continued to meet, even through remote schooling.
  • Larsen Fund for Excellence

    This permanently restricted fund was established in honor of the School’s fourth Head of School, Leslie I. Larsen, and his wife Nancy to provide scholarships to students whose talents strengthen the community, salary supplements to attract outstanding teachers, and funding to provide external experts to visit campus. Les Larsen was the Head of School from 1972 to 1987.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Mary Lou Ellis Earling Education Endowment Fund

    This fund was established by the Ellis family in 1984 in memory of Mary Lou Ellis, mother of former Bush French teacher Bob Ellis. The purpose of the Mary Lou Ellis Earling Education Endowment Fund is to provide financial support for faculty members who lead international trips at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Kristin McInaney, Experiential Programs Manager

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    22 years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Experiential Programs in the last school year?
     This year, The Bush School launched our first Cascades Program with an interdisciplinary course of study, with domestic and international travel, as well as Wilderness Programs.. After planning this initiative with stakeholders across the entire Bush community, we were thrilled to offer this new programming opportunity to our students. The plan was to divide the Upper School program into fall and spring semesters, and have two three-week Cascades terms occur at the end of each semester. The winter Cascades term ran the first three weeks in January, while the spring Cascades term was supposed to run for three weeks in May. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, we were not able to offer our spring Cascades term. However, we are proud of the faculty, staff, and leadership that were committed to this vision and are proud to have completed one term upon which we can build future terms when possible.
    During each Cascade, students take a single interdisciplinary course of study, led by interdepartmental teaching teams. These thematic immersive experiences are comprised of students across all grade levels. Cascades are academically engaging, challenging, and require students to grapple with complex problems and face real-life challenges both on and off campus.
    One of the two international trips offered in the winter term included a trip to Morcocco. Students in this Cascade took deep and powerful dive into the rich culture of Morocco to better understand the intersections of faith and history in this vibrant North African country. This Cascade included a visit to Rabat (the capital of Morocco), a homestay in Marrakech, and community service in a Berber village in the High Atlas Mountains. Personal tours, casual conversations with homestay families and fellow learners, and discussions with activists, professors, religious leaders, and scholars provided students multiple pathways to explore the challenges and opportunities facing this country. This helped students understand how their own culture has shaped their identities and experiences.
    We are so grateful to all of the faculty members that helped to imagine and then bring to life this incredible learning experience for Bush students. 

    What inspired you about your work in Experiential Programs last year?
    One of the interesting and exciting things about Wilderness and International Trips. Sometimes it takes time to get metabolized and processed. The students need time to process the experience. Immersive learning experiences can be overwhelming or difficult during the moment, but later, you realized these really important development steps were made, and the student comes back and says “this was one of the most important experiences of my life.”

    What was the biggest expense for Experiential Programs in 2019-2020?
    Much of our programming could not continue due to the pandemic last spring. However, in the months ahead, we look forward to using creativity, grounded in safety protocols, to continue to offer students safe, engaging Wilderness and International Program opportunities.
  • Meta Johnson O'Crotty Memorial Scholarship Fund

    This permanently restricted fund was established in memory of Meta O’Crotty (1924-1994), legendary Bush teacher for thirty-seven years. Her love of language and literature, staunch independence, and infectious sense of humor touched many lives. Income from this fund provides support for student financial aid.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Peggy O'Neill Skinner Endowment for Curricular Innovation

    The Peggy O’Neill Skinner Endowment for Curricular Innovation was established in 2011 at the behest of a group of Bush alumni on the occasion of Peggy Skinner’s retirement from The Bush School after almost 40 years of service. Income from this endowment supports future interdisciplinary and multi-divisional (K-12) classes and projects, following Peggy’s wish to expand these opportunities beyond Upper School science classes.
    Q&A with Kristin McInaney, Experiential Programs Manager

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    22 years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Experiential Programs in the last school year?
    This year, The Bush School launched our first Cascades Program with an interdisciplinary course of study, with domestic and international travel, as well as Wilderness Programs.. After planning this initiative with stakeholders across the entire Bush community, we were thrilled to offer this new programming opportunity to our students. The plan was to divide the Upper School program into fall and spring semesters, and have two three-week Cascades terms occur at the end of each semester. The winter Cascades term ran the first three weeks in January, while the spring Cascades term was supposed to run for three weeks in May. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, we were not able to offer our spring Cascades term. However, we are proud of the faculty, staff, and leadership that were committed to this vision and are proud to have completed one term upon which we can build future terms when possible.
     
    During each Cascade, students take a single interdisciplinary course of study, led by interdepartmental teaching teams. These thematic immersive experiences are comprised of students across all grade levels. Cascades are academically engaging, challenging, and require students to grapple with complex problems and face real-life challenges both on and off campus.
    One of the two international trips offered in the winter term included a trip to Morcocco. Students in this Cascade took deep and powerful dive into the rich culture of Morocco to better understand the intersections of faith and history in this vibrant North African country. This Cascade included a visit to Rabat (the capital of Morocco), a homestay in Marrakech, and community service in a Berber village in the High Atlas Mountains. Personal tours, casual conversations with homestay families and fellow learners, and discussions with activists, professors, religious leaders, and scholars provided students multiple pathways to explore the challenges and opportunities facing this country. This helped students understand how their own culture has shaped their identities and experiences.
    We are so grateful to all of the faculty members that helped to imagine and then bring to life this incredible learning experience for Bush students. 

    What inspired you about your work in Experiential Programs last year?
    One of the interesting and exciting things about Wilderness and International Trips. Sometimes it takes time to get metabolized and processed. The students need time to process the experience. Immersive learning experiences can be overwhelming or difficult during the moment, but later, you realized these really important development steps were made, and the student comes back and says “this was one of the most important experiences of my life.”

    What was the biggest expense for Experiential Programs in 2019-2020?
    Much of our programming could not continue due to the pandemic last spring. However, in the months ahead, we look forward to using creativity, grounded in safety protocols, to continue to offer students safe, engaging Wilderness and International Program opportunities.
  • Percy L. Abram Fund for Inclusion, Equity, and Justice

    This endowment fund was established in the midst of a global health pandemic and social justice uprising, both of which spotlight the deep-seeded racial inequities in the United States. It was also established six years into the tenure of Head of School Percy L. Abram for whom the fund is named. The Marcotte Solimano family has been inspired by his leadership, intellect, integrity, and authenticity - all critical traits to lead The Bush School in educating the next generation in service to lasting and just change.

    This fund supports diversity, equity, and inclusion programs, strategies, and curriculum and is intentionally designed to give Bush’s Head of School the discretion to identify relevant priorities that offer pathways to societal transformation.
  • Person Family Music Endowment

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 2009 by Mina Brechemin Person ’64 in honor of the Person family. Income from The Person Family Music Endowment provides support for the music program at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Julia Sarewitz, Lower School Music Director and Performing Arts Chair

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2017, three years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Lower School Music in the last school year?
    I was teaching Fifth Grade about the 12-bar Blues progression and improvisation. One student at a time would improvise on the xylophone while everyone else played the progression on their instrument of choice. I had one student who was shy about his musicality and, after some healthy encouragement from his peers, he decided to give it a go. This musically-shy student performed the most incredible, energetic, bluesy solo any of us had heard! The entire classroom erupted in cheers and hoots and hollers afterwards - it was one of those goosebumps, never forget it classroom moments!

    What was the biggest expense for Lower School Music in 2019-2020?
    Purchasing ukuleles for the music classroom. It is incredible how much they have inspired kids and expanded what we do and learn about in music!

    What inspired you about your work in Lower School Music last year? 
    The students! They are such creative and curious people. Seeing them light up about learning a new song, dance, or instrument fuels me to continue to deepen my approach to teaching music.
  • Ragen Family Scholarship Fund

    This permanently restricted endowment fund was established in 2006 by Brooks and Suzanne Ragen to support financial aid at The Bush School. Funds will be awarded annually to an applicant or existing student whose scholarship, aptitude, and potential leadership skills suggest that the student would be a productive member of The Bush School and the Seattle communities. Monies will be made available from the fund every year according to the school’s endowment spending policy.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Robert S. Corkran Wilderness Endowment Fund

    This endowed fund was established through the gifts of many alumni and friends of The Bush School on the occasion of Rob Corkran’s retirement in the spring of 2006. Income from the fund provides support for the operating costs of the school’s wilderness program, including but not limited to financial support for students who cannot otherwise afford to participate in wilderness trips, equipment, and other operating expenses.
    Q&A with Kristin McInaney, Experiential Programs 

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    22 years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Experiential Programs in the last school year?
    One meaningful moment that stands out is a letter we received from the parents of a  Middle School student who went on the Joshua Tree Trip in February 2020. This trip was part of our Wilderness Program Trip offering for the Middle School students.

    The parents shared how grateful they were because this was a positive moment in an otherwise difficult year that continued to bring him joy. He was really struck by the landscape of Joshua Tree, which is so different from the Pacific Northwest. The sunrises and the sunsets and the experiences of being in that environment are beautiful memories he will continue to have. The parents wrote: “You have made an indelible mark in my son’s mind.”

    What inspired you about your work in Experiential Programs last year?
    That’s the interesting and exciting thing about Wilderness Trips. Sometimes it takes time to get metabolized and processed. The students need time to process the experience. Immersive learning experiences can be overwhelming or difficult during the moment, but later, you realized these really important development steps were made, and the student comes back and says “this was one of the most important experiences of my life.”

    What was the biggest expense for Experiential Programs in 2019-2020?
    Much of our programming could not continue due to the pandemic last spring. However, in the months ahead, we look forward to using creativity, grounded in safety protocols, to continue to offer students safe, engaging Wilderness Program opportunities.
  • Ryan Family Endowment for Drama

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 1988 by John and Sally Ryan and their sons, Jeff ’91, Will ’93, and Ben ’97. Additional contributions were received in Sally’s memory following her death in 1999. Income from the Ryan Family Endowment for Drama provides support for the Theater Program at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Casey F. ‘21, Upper School Student and Jeremy Bryan, Upper School Drama Teacher and Performing Arts Chair

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    Casey: 13, since Kindergarten  
    Jeremy: 14 years, since 2006

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to the Upper School Theater program in the last school year?
    Casey: Last fall, Bush's theater department put on The Laramie Project, a documentary-style piece of theater about the reaction to the 1998 murder of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard. His death in Laramie, WY sparked local and national protests, calling for more acceptance of the LGBTQ community. There's one specific scene that held a lot of emotional weight for many of us involved, in which part of the cast sings 'Amazing Grace' to drown out a hateful monologue. This moment was incredibly important to me—like we were directly sharing a message of love and coming together against injustice with the audience.

    What was the biggest expense for the Upper School Theater in 2019-2020?
    Jeremy: The purchases were not as big due to the way the school finished out. The costume budget for The Laramie Project ran close to $3000 alone due to the enormity of the show. Towards the end of the year, we took a look at the needs of the theater and what improvements were priorities.  During the summer, we purchased individual microphones for each of the students in the fall show.  Because of the pandemic, we knew that doing a streamed performance was most likely what would need to happen, so this was the big purchase. 

    What inspired you about your work in the Upper School Theater program last year?
    Casey: The people. Bush's theater department fosters some of the most creative, kind, and dedicated students I've ever had the immense pleasure of working with. Not a day goes by where I'm not grateful for their enthusiasm and friendship. I'm really proud of how our team is adapting to the new challenges posed this year. These circumstances may not be ideal for the theater department, but you'd better believe we're still working!
  • Sheffield and Patricia Phelps Fund

    Sheffield and Patricia Phelps established this permanently restricted fund in 1977 to support the student financial aid program. Shef Phelps was a member of the Board of Trustees from 1959 to 1975. Additional contributions were received in Patty’s memory following her death in 1990.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund

    The Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund was established in honor of Sis Pease’s retirement from the Board of Trustees in 2007. Income from this permanently restricted fund provides support for student financial aid. The generous contributions to the Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund, have provided a legacy that honors the work of Sis Pease at The Bush School. This fund has received a multitude of gifts from Board members, faculty, parents, and alumni.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    How many years have you worked at Bush? 
    Since 2019. For one and a half years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    I would have to say that the most meaningful moment this past year was Bush leadership's response at the start of the pandemic. Back in March, we began to realize the scale and impact that the financial and health crisis would have on our community and began to start planning. It was clear from the Board and from Head of School Percy L. Abram, that supporting our community was a priority and we have been working directly with the finance committee to monitor the need and the budget. Over the past six months, we've been able to support fourteen families (nineteen students) who have experienced financial hardship to ensure that they can remain as part of the Bush community.

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid in 2019-2020?
    The Bush School awarded close to $4 million in financial aid for the 2019-2020 school year. We are also able to provide up to $200,000 in additional financial aid for programs, events, and items not covered by tuition.

    What inspired you about your work in Financial Aid last year? 
    As a school that prides itself on community and relationship building, we felt that it was important to do what we could to help families who have been impacted financially during the pandemic. It is truly inspiring to see Bush leadership's commitment to supporting members of our community in this way.
  • Technology Endowment Fund

    This fund was created with funds contributed to the 2001: A Bush Odyssey Fund-an-Item by parents, faculty, staff, alumnae/i, and other friends to support the use of technology at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Tracy Asplen, Middle School Technology Teacher

    How many years have you worked at Bush?
    This is my second year. 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Middle School Technology in the last school year?
    When we went to remote school last spring, I was in a unique situation because I had all 180+ middle school students at the same time. I decided to engage them in a Design Thinking "sprint" to come up with solutions to real world problems using technology. I surveyed students about their interests, divided them into teams, and engaged them in "how might we..." questions. These questions ranged from making grocery shopping safer to developing new hobbies. Students researched, came up with conclusions, and created prototypes to answer the questions. Results included cookbooks, games, and Kahoots, just to name a few. The entire process was supervised by me using SprintBase, an online "sprint" facilitation website. I worked closely with the company, and they even ended up writing an article on their website about my project.

    What inspired you about your work in Middle School Technology last year? 
    I really wanted students to know that their ideas and opinions mattered.

    What was the biggest expense for Middle School Technology in 2019-2020?
    My project was free, but I know that many students needed tech support for remote school, including devices, routers, etc. As a department, we explored options for creating online galleries of student work, but they were cost prohibitive at the time. Thankfully, this year I was able to purchase Microbit kits for every middle school student. Using these devices, we are able to focus our attention on coding.
  • The Dylan Young '88 Fund for Possibility

    Established in 2015 to provide financial aid to students with physical limitations. Dylan Young '88 trained and competed in wheelchair track and won a gold medal in the 1988 Seoul Paralympics, going on to compete in wheelchair rugby, tennis, crew, and sailing.
    For the past several years, The Bush School community has worked together to envision a New Upper School Building located next to Gracemont. This is the first step in Bush’s Education Master Plan. The expanded space in our New Upper School Building will help optimize Bush’s enrollment. A larger Upper School community will increase access to a Bush education, welcoming a more diverse community into the school, and creating an even more robust learning environment and student experience.

    Ten new modern classrooms and 20,000 square feet in additional educational space will create an even more robust and adaptable learning environment for our students and teachers. The expanded space will allow Bush to thoughtfully grow our Upper School admissions capacity, bringing a greater diversity of student perspectives to the classroom. Class size will continue to remain small relative to our peer schools. Without the need to increase faculty commensurately, the larger student body will allow the school to fulfill other strategic priorities, including financial aid and staff compensation. 

    The new Lake Washington Entrance will provide enhanced ADA accessibility to the Upper School campus and the new multipurpose room will allow students and teachers across our K-12 community to gather and connect.

    In a groundbreaking event in November 2020, Head of School Percy L. Abram, Ph.D shared his enthusiasm for improving accessibility to the Bush campus “For the very first time, one of the things that we’ll be able to say is that this is a truly ADA accessible Upper School.  Coming in from Lake Washington Boulevard, being able to take the elevator to the main floor and then exiting out.”

    Your vision and leadership giving to the endowment helped ensure that future projects are more inclusive of everyone in our community. Thank you for your positive impact and legacy on this campus.
  • The Frank Magusin Head of School Discretionary Endowment Fund

    The Frank Magusin Head of School Discretionary Endowment Fund was established in 2013 to honor the legacy of Frank Magusin who served as Head of School from 2000 to 2014. Income from this fund is allocated at the discretion of the current Head of School, enabling the Head of School to make targeted investments in new and innovative programs and to direct support to areas that further The Bush School’s mission.
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2019-2020 school year, we focused on three areas in particular: civics education, supporting student affinity groups, and technology pedagogy. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. These priorities, and so many others, would not be possible without donor support.

    Civics Education:
    This year, History Day was one of the last Upper School events that took place prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and subsequent school closures issued by Governor Jay Inslee. On March 4, Nancy Bowman, Upper School Civics Teacher, organized History Day, inviting members of the broader Seattle community to explore local and regional history, issues of social justice, and avenues for civic engagement.
     
    Fifty-minute sessions were held on the Upper School campus, and the keynote address was delivered in Schuchart Gym by Superior Court Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court. The robust line-up of speakers included experts in their respective fields of law, policy, and community organizing:
     
    History offerings
    • Stephanie Johnson-Toliver from the Black Heritage Society on Black history in Washington State
    • Nina Wallace and Caitlin Oiye from Densho on Japanese American internment and how the Japanese community (and other marginalized/oppressed communities) can and should tell their stories and determine the historical narrative
    • Cori Tingstad ’14 on redlining and segregation in Seattle, past and present
    • Rahul Gupta from the Wing Luke Museum–on the 1886 Chinese Riots
     
    Social Justice offerings
    • Tiffany Lamoreaux of Solid Ground on anti-racism
    • Judge Frank Cuthbertson of Pierce County Superior Court on the decriminalization of mental illness
     
    Political/Governance/Civic Engagement offerings
    • Austin Jenkins, political reporter out of Olympia for local NPR stations
    • Lisa Ayrault of FairVote Washington about the merits and drive for ranked choice voting here and across the nation
    • Common Purpose, dedicated to ending voter suppression and ensuring voter rights and participation
    • Osta Davis ’09 part of the Democratic Campaign Committee in the Washington State House
    • Omar Cuevas Vega of the State Poverty Action Network, storytelling for advocacy
    In a year ripe for political engagement, History Day illuminated the diverse ways in which students can be civically engaged and effect positive social changes in their local communities.
     
    Supporting Student Affinity Groups
    Another way that our students build community is through clubs and affinity groups. Clubs are largely defined as interest groups: anyone with an interest in a theme or activity can participate. Affinity groups are spaces where participants must all share an identity that connects them.
     
    In the Upper School, there are more than forty student-led clubs and affinity groups focused on issues of human rights and exploring racial identity.

    The Bush School is proud to be mission-driven and student-led. I am especially proud of the work of Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW) this year. With the recent increase of conversations around anti-racism and white identity, Upper School students wanted to re-imagine their anti-racist group from White Students Combatting Racism to Blazers Understanding Whiteness (BUW). Two students, Celia and Louise, recently put together a letter to the Upper School with this information. In their words, here is what BUW is and how it has evolved:

    What is BUW?
    BUW is a space for white people to educate ourselves about whiteness as an identity and culture rather than a societal default. The burden of the education of white people has fallen on people of color for far too long, and our goal is to help Bush students and faculty dig into our own whiteness and the feelings that come with it. We work hard to maintain a sense of transparency and accountability by keeping public notes of our meetings and collaborating with race-based affinity groups and qualified professionals (people of color paid to do race work).
     
    How has BUW evolved?
    Two years ago, we decided Bush’s previous anti-racist group, White Students Combatting Racism (WSCR), was not serving the community, so we got to work on how to improve it. We sent out forms to the student body and got feedback about how the group had functioned in the past. Many students voiced concerns about an all-white space, as well as worry that WSCR had “white savior” motives, since racial progress has never been spearheaded by white people and the dismantling of racist systems cannot be done by white people alone. After hearing how people felt, we made some changes. First, after a four-month process of in-depth conversation, research, and reflection, we found a new name that we thought better suited our motives: Blazers Understanding Whiteness. We also changed our mission and focus to better fit the role of white community members and the needs of The Bush School.
     
    The student and adult catalysts working on these issues now and in the decades prior have created a true learning environment, improving their practices to best support their peers. This affinity group continued to meet, even through remote schooling.

    Technology Pedagogy 
    The ability for students to meet, for classes to continue, and for teachers to troubleshoot, largely depends on our incredible Technology team, led by Director Ethan Delavan.

    Earlier this year, Ethan spoke about the importance of technology as a measurement of literacy in our society today. Especially during this exceptional time, technology has provided a platform to connect, learn, perform, and practice safely.

    “Technology really is now where literacy was maybe 200 years ago, where all of a sudden it's become something that's really important for all of us to know at some level and have some real competencies in technology. And it is the basis of human interaction in a globalized society.”

    Some technology performs better depending on the need of the user. Part of the challenge for the Bush Tech team is not only the increase in need, but the increase in expertise on the numerous platforms that exist for educators today.

    In addition to actual learning content, Bush teachers needed to recreate an environment that was comfortable for learning. Social emotional learning can help build that environment, even in a virtual classroom, by creating connections and community. The way technology and support was leveraged to empower our community is inspiring. Additionally, Ethan spoke to the ways that their team, teachers, and staff, address some of these challenges by asking a lot of questions.

    “It’s not that each teacher needed to come to the same answer. Each teacher came to a lot of different answers. And the way you do a physical education class might be really different than the way you do a biology class at a distance. But if you start asking those same questions about student experience, you tend to really deepen the kind of learning that happens remotely and still maintain a really experiential focus for students.”

    In the years ahead, technology will continue to be an important aspect in creating a rich learning environment for our students. As Ethan shared, and as our school community has demonstrated, technology extends far beyond the physical laptops, cords, and routers; there is a strategic pedagogy that undergirds our effort to educate our students and support our faculty.

    From technology pedagogy, supporting student affinity groups, and engaging civics education curriculum, our entire community grew from these innovative experiences. Your support of the endowment and strategic priorities ensures that our school continues to thrive, no matter how difficult the circumstances. This past year has shown us that we are stronger when we collaborate and imagine together, and this is made possible by commitment of philanthropy to The Bush School.
  • The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus

    In memory of Ian Fair, The Bush School and Ian’s loving family and friends have established The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus. To honor Ian’s vision and dedication, the Fund supports the integration of wilderness, cultural, and immersive experiential learning for students of The Bush School and the Methow Valley. Ian envisioned a unique and powerful opportunity for students from the east and west sides of the Cascades to engage with and learn from one another in the magic of the Methow Valley – a place Ian cherished and called home. Those involved with the program will carry forth his vision and infectious enthusiasm for teaching, the community, and the great outdoors. In his role as program coordinator, Ian was hired to launch an experiential and project-based curriculum on the new campus. Ian was the perfect partner to build bridges, generate big ideas, and share the beauty and wonder of the places and people of the Methow Valley. With passion, experience, and a generous heart, Ian immediately connected with students, colleagues, and the community to pave the way for a program to deliver on the school’s bold promise of sparking in students of diverse backgrounds and talents a passion for learning, accomplishment, and contribution to their communities.
    Q&A with Stacy Bell, Middle School English Faculty

    How many years have you been at Bush?
    Since 2021, eight years.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to the Methow in the last school year?
    For four day and three nights, Saturday, February 8-Tuesday, February 11, nine middle school students led by Middle School Teachers Stacy Bell, Brian Rafferty, and Caroline Huxtable had fun in the snow participating in Methow Winter Sports including snow shoeing, fat-tire biking, and cross-country skiing.

    The key elements of the Methow Winter Sports Wilderness Experience are building unity of purpose in our group, taking risks by trying new winter activities, and connecting to place through a visit to the Methow. The activity leaders are coaching on the level of risk posed by the activities and focus on participation over competence. We look for student leadership in roles such as: leading the group on the cross-country ski trail, proposing games or activities during down time, and choice activities such as building a snow shelter or a campfire in the snow. 

    In addition to the outdoor activities, Bush students connected to the Methow community by staffing the warming hut, located on the ground ground level of the main building at the Methow campus,  and partnered with students from Methow Valley schools. The Bush group worked cooperatively to cook their meals and explore the Bush Methow Campus. 

    What inspired you about your work in the Methow last year?
    This is an introduction to the Methow, and it is open to all MS students. It appeals to the young student who may never have been away from home and the student who wants to try a wilderness experience for the first time. Kids have praised the elements of choice and being in a winter environment. Many students were trying cross-country skiing for the first time.

    Additional comments 
    This was one of the final trips the school did before shelter in place was issued by Governor Jay Inslee. This is a moment that the trip leaders and students cherish even more knowing we could enjoy the Methow and its community.
  • Wang-Zhu Chinese Language Program Fund for Mandarin Studies

    Established in September, 2020 the purpose of The Wang-Zhu Chinese Language Program Fund for Mandarin Studies is to support the Middle School and Upper School Mandarin language programs for at least the next 10 years at The Bush School. The goal of a comprehensive Mandarin program is to provide students the opportunity to study throughout their Middle School and Upper School years, gaining an appreciation and proficiency of the language and culture.
  • Wyman Family Endowment Fund

    The Wyman family, including Ann (Chi Chi) ’64, Deehan (Dee) ’65, and Virginia ’67, established this endowment in 1998 as a memorial to their sister Helen (Class of 1966). Income from The Wyman Family Endowment Fund provides support for maintenance and improvement of the lower campus.
    Due to COVID-19, The Bush School Senior Leadership, with collaboration from the Facilities Department, upgraded numerous spaces across campus to ensure the safety of faculty, staff, and students returning to campus.

    Lower School Maintenance and Improvements:
    • Installed Global Plasma Solution system on a HVAC equipment 
    • Replaced CO2 sensors in the parking garage
    • Replaced carpet in Room 213
    • Installed six Smarboards – Kindergarten–Second Grade
    • Screened and refinished Schuchart Gym floor
    • Replaced basketball backboard drive motors in Schuchart
    • Installed Pixellot camera in Schuchart Gym
    • Replaced and repaired window blinds
    • Renovated Lower School Admin Office into a Wellness Coordinator space
    • Modified Community Room Kitchenette as required for an isolation room including light and exhaust fan controls, air pressure monitor and furnishings.
    • Installed synchronized clock system in Lower School classrooms
    • Upgraded Boiler flow controls in the Lower School
    • Various patching and painting
    • Installed new projector in the Lower School Music classroom
    • Secured Extended Day outside storage area with extruded wire panels

Contact Us

Thank you for visiting this page. If you have any questions, please reach out to the Bush Development Office at development@bush.edu.