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Giving

Endowment

The Bush Endowment

The endowment is an important part of the school’s overall fiscal year performance. Assistant Head for Finance and Operations Robin Bentley underscored this sharing: “Endowments are considered a hallmark of financial sustainability.” Our donors’ commitment to the endowment supports the school’s vitality and solidifies their legacy with the school.  The value of Bush’s endowment as of June 30, 2021 was $26,583,818.

An endowment is considered an indicator of the financial health of an institution. We are pleased to honor the generosity of donors to the endowment fund. The Development Office shares the status of the Bush endowment with donors, and the fund(s) they contributed. Each year, benefactors receive a financial report as well as a story, an experience or project related to their fund.

The endowment is held, managed, and invested under the direction of the Board of Trustees of the School.  Recently, the Board has invested 20% of the Endowment, currently about $6 million, in ESG (Environmental, Social, Governance) funds. This move represents an alignment of the School’s values with the fund investments. Total spending of the funds for any given fiscal year will be capped at five percent (5%) of the average market value of the funds, unless otherwise approved by the Board of Trustees based on a recommendation of the Finance Committee of the Board.
 
Thank you for visiting this page. If you have any questions, please reach out to the Bush Development Office at development@bush.edu.

Endowment Funds

List of 36 items.

  • Alan Turing Endowment for Computer Science Instruction

    Gabe Newell and Lisa Mennet, and their children Gray Newell ’16 and Luc Mennet ’18, established the Alan Turing Endowment for Computer Science Instruction in 2013 to provide funding for computer programming courses in the Upper School. Over time, and as technology evolves, the specific use of the fund may change to support instruction in new and emerging areas in the disciplines of computer science and technology.
    Q&A with Chandru Narayan, Upper School Technology Faculty
    How long have you been at Bush? 
    3 years 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Technology and Innovation in the last school year?
    The students captured a whirlpool galaxy image with the telescope. It was midnight on the turf field, and we had invited faculty and parents to watch the image capture on a monitor. The joint celebration with the students and also the other faculty and parents that had assembled, was a very special moment. Human beings evolved to connect with the universe, by connecting the two, there's tremendous power in teaching and learning. The fact that the students obtained the image is special, because it’s quite different from googling a telescope image because they were the ones who captured it. It's one thing to show the spectrum of oxygen on the internet, it's another to do it on a device you built. Simply getting the image was great, and then getting the data and discussing it brought everything together. 
      
    What was one of the biggest expenses that the program took on last year? 
    The telescope and accessories, by far, eclipsed everything else. A telescope costs roughly $8,000, and there are additional accessories needed. 

    About the M51 - Whirlpool Galaxy
    The Whirlpool Galaxy 23 Million Light Years away is interacting with another small irregular galaxy. It is about 1/2 the size of our own Milky Way about 40,000 light years in diameter. Its plentiful bright blue and young stars dot its spiral arms. This image was obtained by the telescope after 90-minutes of the telescope staring at the exact same point in the sky!
    For more information, check out The Bush Telescope’s website: 
    https://www.thebushtelescope.com/#h.mb8qtqplvkjd
  • Build Bush Phase 2 Faculty Endowment Fund

    In 2001, The Bush School and The Board of Trustees embarked on an ambitious fundraising campaign and raised philanthropic support for new facilities, the endowment, enhanced programs, and other proper Board-designated purposes.
    Head of School Priorities 2020-2021 School Year
    Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.
    Head of School | The Bush School
     
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2020-2021  school year, we focused on three areas in particular: Experiential programs and the Methow Campus, Performing Arts, and Faculty and Staff professional development. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. 
     
    Experiential Programs featuring the Bush Methow Campus
    The Bush Methow campus is a resource to both The Bush School and the Methow Valley community. We strive to find more ways to connect with the community and to serve the community in that capacity as a resource. Right now, we are really listening and in conversation with members of the community to ensure any progress made with our programs are meaningful and collaborative. 
    There's a sense of quiet and reflection that you can achieve there that helps to create transformative educational experiences. The campus is in a really special place along the Methow river and among the oldest stands of cedar trees in the state. There are trails and the goat wall (climbing rock) and it's just a place to be contemplative. 

    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 

    Performing Arts featuring the Theater Program 
    Upper School Drama Teacher Hilary Moore started working at Bush during the pandemic, but she is not new to the school, she is also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    One of her most significant moments with the theater department last year included the production of Twelfth Night. Of the experience she shared, “Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.
    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm.”
     
    Faculty & Staff Professional Development
    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."
    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.
  • Celebrate Bush Faculty Compensation Endowment Fund

    In March 2002, contributions to the Fund-an-Item at Celebrate Bush: The Art of Teaching made by parents, faculty, staff, alumni, and other friends established a permanently restricted endowment to support the compensation of Bush teachers. Income from the Celebrate Bush Faculty Compensation Fund provides support for faculty salaries.
    Faculty and Staff Professional Development at The Bush School 2020-2021
    Sarah Smith
    Assistant Head of Academics | The Bush School

    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."

    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.

    In 2020-2021, student mental health and wellbeing was an especially important topic for all adults in the school. Upper School Counselor Maria Mathiesen took two six-week courses through Psychwire, an online platform with courses for health and mental health professionals by leaders in evidence-based therapy. 

    One was on Motivational Interviewing which focused on how to engage with students in a practical way to help them find and build their own motivation for change. The other focused on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) skill building, specifically in the areas of mindfulness, emotion regulation, interpersonal skills, and distress tolerance. 

    Both of these courses helped provide Maria with the skills to proactively support the year of unknowns for students.  
  • Class of 1965 Memorial Fund

    This endowed fund was established in 2006 by the members of the Helen Bush School Class of 1965 to honor and memorialize the class and its members. The Class of 1965 Memorial Fund provides support for faculty enrichment opportunities. (1) Monies will be made available for faculty enrichment every year based on the formula described in the school’s endowment spending policy. (2) The exact use of the available funds will be determined by the Director of Finance and Operations working in conjunction with the Head of School. (3) The members of the Class of 1965 will receive a report from the Development Office each year detailing the fund’s earnings and use.
    Faculty and Staff Professional Development at The Bush School 2020-2021
    Sarah Smith
    Assistant Head of Academics | The Bush School

    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 

    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."

    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.

    In 2020-2021, student mental health and wellbeing was an especially important topic for all adults in the school. Upper School Counselor Maria Mathiesen took two six-week courses through Psychwire, an online platform with courses for health and mental health professionals by leaders in evidence-based therapy. 

    One was on Motivational Interviewing which focused on how to engage with students in a practical way to help them find and build their own motivation for change. The other focused on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) skill building, specifically in the areas of mindfulness, emotion regulation, interpersonal skills, and distress tolerance. 

    Both of these courses helped provide Maria with the skills to proactively support the year of unknowns for students.  
  • Endowment for Athletic Excellence

    This fund was jointly established in 2008 by The Bush School and anonymous founding donors. The Endowment for Athletic Excellence provides the athletic department with additional resources to support its programs.
    Q&A with Middle School P.E. Teacher Marcelino Dumpit Jr. 

    Years at Bush 

    I’ve been at Bush ten years and serve in a variety of roles including Middle School Physical Education Teacher, Physical Education Department Head, Varsity Girls Soccer Coach, and Varsity Boys Soccer Coach.

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience in the last school year?
    The boys soccer team completed the sweep of winning the new Emerald Sound Conference league and tournament. The team completed an impressive regular season with a 7-1 record. In the semifinals they faced off with the Seattle Academy Cardinals and secured a 3-0 win to advance to the tournament final. In the championship, they beat Overlake scoring a golden goal in overtime. The season included seven clean sheets, and an outstanding goal ratio of 23-5.

    What was one of the biggest expenses that Athletics took on last year? 
    Speaking for the soccer program, the biggest expenses are the equipment (jerseys, warm ups, stadium jackets, pinnies, benches, balls, cones, etc). It is important to the program because we want to look put together, confident, and united. We want the players to be proud to sport Blazer gear.
  • Faye Frederick Padelford Fund

    Philip S. Padelford established this unrestricted fund in 1993 in memory of his first wife, Fay Frederick Padelford, a mother of four Bush alumnae and a member of the Board of Trustees for many years. This endowment honors her deep involvement in the life of The Bush School and is made possible by contributions from Philip and other members of the Padelford family. Income from the fund is used at the Head of School’s discretion to support the areas of greatest need at The Bush School.
    Head of School Priorities 2020-2021 School Year
    Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.
    Head of School | The Bush School
     
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2020-2021  school year, we focused on three areas in particular: Experiential programs and the Methow Campus, Performing Arts, and Faculty and Staff professional development. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. 
     
    Experiential Programs featuring the Bush Methow Campus
    The Bush Methow campus is a resource to both The Bush School and the Methow Valley community. We strive to find more ways to connect with the community and to serve the community in that capacity as a resource. Right now, we are really listening and in conversation with members of the community to ensure any progress made with our programs are meaningful and collaborative.
     
    There's a sense of quiet and reflection that you can achieve there that helps to create transformative educational experiences. The campus is in a really special place along the Methow river and among the oldest stands of cedar trees in the state. There are trails and the goat wall (climbing rock) and it's just a place to be contemplative. 

    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 

    Performing Arts featuring the Theater Program 

    Upper School Drama Teacher Hilary Moore started working at Bush during the pandemic, but she is not new to the school, she is also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    One of her most significant moments with the theater department last year included the production of Twelfth Night. Of the experience she shared, “Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.

    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm.”
     
    Faculty & Staff Professional Development
     
    In the 2021-2022 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 

    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."

    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.
  • Fred A. Dust Technology Fund

    The permanently restricted Fred A. Dust Technology Fund was established in 1996 in recognition of Fred Dust’s significant contribution to the development and integration of technology in the educational program at Bush during his tenure as Head of School (1987 to 1996). Income from this fund supports technology projects.
    Q&A with Chandru Narayan, Upper School Technology Faculty
    How long have you been at Bush? 
    3 years 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Technology and Innovation in the last school year?
    The students captured a whirlpool galaxy image with the telescope. It was midnight on the turf field, and we had invited faculty and parents to watch the image capture on a monitor. The joint celebration with the students and also the other faculty and parents that had assembled, was a very special moment. Human beings evolved to connect with the universe, by connecting the two, there's tremendous power in teaching and learning. The fact that the students obtained the image is special, because it’s quite different from googling a telescope image because they were the ones who captured it. It's one thing to show the spectrum of oxygen on the internet, it's another to do it on a device you built. Simply getting the image was great, and then getting the data and discussing it brought everything together. 
      
    What was one of the biggest expenses that the program took on last year? 
    The telescope and accessories, by far, eclipsed everything else. A telescope costs roughly $8,000, and there are additional accessories needed. 

    About the M51 - Whirlpool Galaxy
    The Whirlpool Galaxy 23 Million Light Years away is interacting with another small irregular galaxy. It is about 1/2 the size of our own Milky Way about 40,000 light years in diameter. Its plentiful bright blue and young stars dot its spiral arms. This image was obtained by the telescope after 90-minutes of the telescope staring at the exact same point in the sky!
    For more information, check out The Bush Telescope’s website: 
    https://www.thebushtelescope.com/#h.mb8qtqplvkjd
  • Fund for Socio-Economic Diversity

    The permanently restricted Fund for Socio-Economic Diversity was established in 1996 by friends of The Bush School to support financial aid for students from middle-income families.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Gardner Nettleton LeCorcq Endowment Fund

    Martha Nettleton Gardner ’36 and her sister, Jane Nettleton LeCocq, established this permanently restricted fund in 1971 to provide scholarship grants. Income from the fund supports financial aid for students selected by the Head of School or a committee appointed by them.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • General Endowment

    The School began an ambitious capital campaign in 1997, a portion of which went to this general endowment fund. The income generated from the General Endowment is unrestricted as to purpose.
    Head of School Priorities 2020-2021 School Year
    Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.
    Head of School | The Bush School
     
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2020-2021  school year, we focused on three areas in particular: Experiential programs and the Methow Campus, Performing Arts, and Faculty and Staff professional development. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. 
     
    Experiential Programs featuring the Bush Methow Campus
    The Bush Methow campus is a resource to both The Bush School and the Methow Valley community. We strive to find more ways to connect with the community and to serve the community in that capacity as a resource. Right now, we are really listening and in conversation with members of the community to ensure any progress made with our programs are meaningful and collaborative. 
    There's a sense of quiet and reflection that you can achieve there that helps to create transformative educational experiences. The campus is in a really special place along the Methow river and among the oldest stands of cedar trees in the state. There are trails and the goat wall (climbing rock) and it's just a place to be contemplative. 

    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 

    Performing Arts featuring the Theater Program 
    Upper School Drama Teacher Hilary Moore started working at Bush during the pandemic, but she is not new to the school, she is also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    One of her most significant moments with the theater department last year included the production of Twelfth Night. Of the experience she shared, “Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.
    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm.”
     
    Faculty & Staff Professional Development
    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."
    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.
  • George W. Taylor Faculty Endowment Fund

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 1977 in memory of George W. Taylor, who taught at The Bush School from 1972-1976. The fund honors George W. Taylor, a much admired faculty member, whose name has become synonymous with excellence in teaching in the Bush community, and it acknowledges the invaluable contributions of Bush teachers today by providing support for faculty sabbaticals.
    Due to COVID-19, The Bush School did not offer faculty sabbatical in the 2020-2021 school year. In the absence of sabbatical, funding from the George Taylor Endowment Fund helped provide support for faculty salary increases. The information below is for the upcoming recipient of The George Taylor Sabbatical for the 2021-2022 school year. 

    Upper School Art Teacher and Art Department Chair Marilyn Smith is the recipient of 2021-2022 George Taylor Sabbatical. Marilyn will take her leave in the spring. 

    The George Taylor Sabbatical Grant Committee did not accept new applications for sabbatical grants this year, but carried over the applications from the faculty who applied during the 2018-2019 school year. It was a very competitive application pool, and Marilyn’s application was selected by the committee among many impressive proposals.  

    Marilyn explained that she plans, "to further my education on topics of social inclusion and develop tools to promote positive change, and to expand and strengthen my artistic practice and knowledge. I also plan to use part of my sabbatical to travel to Japan, a country I have chosen, in part, because of its cultural and artistic importance to the curriculum that I teach, including printmaking, metalworking and drawing. I see a sabbatical as a time to think deeply, observe, create, challenge myself, and grow.” 

    We look forward to sharing more about Marilyn’s experiences away and know that our students will benefit from her continued study, creation, and reflection.
  • Gerlich Fund for Faculty Salaries

    The Gerlich Fund for Faculty Salaries was created in 1999 through the gifts of Katharyn A. Gerlich to support the compensation of Bush teachers. Income from this permanently restricted fund is used to provide funding for faculty salaries.
    Faculty and Staff Professional Development at The Bush School 2020-2021
    Sarah Smith
    Assistant Head of Academics | The Bush School

    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 

    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."

    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.

    In 2020-2021, student mental health and wellbeing was an especially important topic for all adults in the school. Upper School Counselor Maria Mathiesen took two six-week courses through Psychwire, an online platform with courses for health and mental health professionals by leaders in evidence-based therapy. 

    One was on Motivational Interviewing which focused on how to engage with students in a practical way to help them find and build their own motivation for change. The other focused on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) skill building, specifically in the areas of mindfulness, emotion regulation, interpersonal skills, and distress tolerance. 

    Both of these courses helped provide Maria with the skills to proactively support the year of unknowns for students.  
  • Goldmark Memorial Fund

    The Goldmark Memorial Fund was established in the months following the Goldmark family’s tragic death in 1985 in memory of Chuck, Annie, Derek ’92, and Colin ’94 Goldmark. The income from this permanently restricted fund supports student financial aid.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Jeri Lee Cunningham '71 Endowed Scholarship Fund for the Performing Arts

    The Jeri Lee Cunningham '71 Endowed Scholarship Fund for the Performing Arts was established in honor of Jeri Lee Cunningham ’71 who attended Bush from seventh to twelfth grade and passed away before the age of nineteen. Jeri was active in the Bush school community, especially in the performing arts. The fund is intended to provide financial support and give preference to those students who demonstrate a verified need for financial assistance and an interest and ability in one or all of the following in order of preference - ice-skating, dance, or music.
    Q&A with Jill Wangsgard, Upper School Music Teacher

    How long have you been at Bush?
    21 years, and full time since 2006 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to the music department in the last school year?
    Broken Records (The Bush School’s student-run music production group) put on three virtual venues, with tons of student musicians recording and mixing on their computers. The students write 85-100 songs each year and make and sell merchandise. In 2020-2021, one of the virtual Venue themes was Camp Venue, and the students made video sketches around a campfire to introduce each of the electronic songs that were played on the livestream.  The next hybrid Venue is December 10, 2021. 

    What was the biggest expense for Venue last year?
    Last year we paid two alumni to help with Venue. They were so generous with their time and everything they put in. Caleb Stein ‘15 mastered the whole soundtrack with the visuals made by students, and they really helped to make digital Venue a success.  

    Additional Comments
    Your own work, composition, creativity, gives you the freedom to be free and move in whatever way you want to move and be creative, that mindset is what makes the music department and Bush special.  
  • Julie Henke Dahlgren ’54 Endowment for Leadership

    Established by Donald Dahlgren and his children in 2011 to honor Julie's role as a student leader at Bush in an effort to prepare Bush students to take leadership roles in making the world a better place after they graduate.
    Q&A with Sosna B., Class of 2022

    Years at Bush 
    Five, I started in Eighth Grade 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience in the last school year?
    I have two. The first meaningful moment in the last school year was being able to play sports, even with the shorter season. I loved being able to play with my teammates and having a great team dynamic on the court. A specific moment I remember with basketball was when we beat SAAS, since Bush had never done that before in basketball. This was a big game for us and we came into it ready to give our all, but also knowing that the outcome would most likely not go in our favor. This made us even more motivated though, because we were considered the underdogs and we left all of our stresses off the court, and when we stepped onto the court, we gave it our all. At the end, when the shot-clock got to one-second and we heard the buzzer, we all hugged each other in pure shock and also amazement at how well we pulled off that win.

    The second was my involvement with Girl Up Club. We were hesitant to be an educational club since we wanted to keep engagement with our club high. But, last year we took the risk of making our club both action-based and educational. I took lead on these lessons, and one of the most memorable for me was giving a presentation of Black Women for Women's History Month. This was incredibly meaningful because I not only got to research Black Women in history and learn about them, but I also got to engage our members in the club with it. Afterwards, we had an amazing conversation about why it is that Women of Color tend to be erased in history, and we all just got to celebrate their voices, and learn about these women together which was very meaningful.

    For more information about Girl Up Club, check out our Instagram page
    https://instagram.com/bushschoolgirlup?utm_medium=copy_link
  • Larsen Fund for Excellence

    This permanently restricted fund was established in honor of the School’s fourth Head of School, Leslie I. Larsen, and his wife Nancy to provide scholarships to students whose talents strengthen the community, salary supplements to attract outstanding teachers, and funding to provide external experts to visit campus. Les Larsen was the Head of School from 1972 to 1987.
    Financial Aid & Faculty Staff Professional Development

    Financial Aid with Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Adam Choice

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.

    Faculty and Staff Professional Development with Assistant Head of Academics Sarah Smith

    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."

    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.

    In 2020-2021, student mental health and wellbeing was an especially important topic for all adults in the school. Upper School Counselor Maria Mathiesen took two six-week courses through Psychwire, an online platform with courses for health and mental health professionals by leaders in evidence-based therapy. 

    One was on Motivational Interviewing which focused on how to engage with students in a practical way to help them find and build their own motivation for change. The other focused on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) skill building, specifically in the areas of mindfulness, emotion regulation, interpersonal skills, and distress tolerance. 

    Both of these courses helped provide Maria with the skills to proactively support the year of unknowns for students.  
  • Mary Lou Ellis Earling Education Endowment Fund

    This fund was established by the Ellis family in 1984 in memory of Mary Lou Ellis, mother of former Bush French teacher Bob Ellis. The purpose of the Mary Lou Ellis Earling Education Endowment Fund is to provide financial support for faculty members who lead international trips at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Erik Gearhart, Eighth Grade History Teacher
     
    Years at Bush 
    Fifteen
     
    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience in the last school year?
    Last year for the San Juan Sea Kayaking E-week was the first time all year that kids got to take their masks off and run around together, invent games, and more importantly socialize with other students and teachers. These trips are the best way to get to know the students, especially in Covid times. Not being able to have these trips for almost a whole year meant I didn't get to know my kids the way I usually do. We went to fourteen different islands in the San Juans and it was a sixteen day expedition full of camping, cooking meals, and navigating. We saw a lot of porpoises, sea lions, harbor seals, and magnificent sunsets. Kids had to dig deep, it's a long time away from home, and long days, including a sixteen mile day. 
     
    What was one of the biggest expenses that experiential programs took on last year? 
    Bush owns its own fleet of kayaks, each one costing about $5,000-$6,000. We originally received the fleet from a philanthropic gift. The kayak fleet requires repair and maintenance costs that are an additional cost each year. Other expenses included Personal Floatation Devices (PFDs) and wetsuits. 

    Additional Comments
    A lot of independent schools have outdoor programs, but one of the things that distinguishes the programs at Bush is that they are designed and led by Bush faculty, which ties back to Bush academics and creates camaraderie amongst students and faculty to make it more connected to campus. We use a lot fewer outside contractors at Bush, and we have a faculty who love to teach experientially. We are weaving in curriculum to the outdoor classroom environment, and truly allowing students to experience education. 
     
    A story from February 29, 2020 while on the Joshua Tree Climbing and Mojave Desert Studies program, one of our Middle School Wilderness trips we offer throughout the year:
    This trip is a seven-day program of immersive lessons on geology, biology, public lands, and outdoor education. 
     
    We departed for that trip in a world that was quickly changing. We didn't know how much, though, until we started our journey back home. As our van full of beaming students and tired teachers headed down the mountains to catch a plane back to Seattle, our cell phones started lighting up with urgent messages from our school counselor, Gayle Gingold. The emerging pandemic had gotten much worse, she said, and we should be very careful with washing our hands and avoiding contacting surfaces on the plane. 
     
    We couldn't know it at the time, but that trip was to become the last overnight off-campus program Bush would run for over a year. 
  • Meta Johnson O'Crotty Memorial Scholarship Fund

    This permanently restricted fund was established in memory of Meta O’Crotty (1924-1994), legendary Bush teacher for thirty-seven years. Her love of language and literature, staunch independence, and infectious sense of humor touched many lives. Income from this fund provides support for student financial aid.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Peggy O'Neill Skinner Endowment for Curricular Innovation

    The Peggy O’Neill Skinner Endowment for Curricular Innovation was established in 2011 at the behest of a group of Bush alumni on the occasion of Peggy Skinner’s retirement from The Bush School after almost 40 years of service. Income from this endowment supports future interdisciplinary and multi-divisional (K-12) classes and projects, following Peggy’s wish to expand these opportunities beyond Upper School science classes.
    Q&A with Brooke Krolick, Upper School Science Faculty 

    Years at Bush 
    Nine

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience in the last school year?
    I had the privilege of co-leading the Happy Inside and Out: The Art and Science of Wellbeing Cascade last spring with Upper School English Teacher Chelsea Jennings. Our goal was to explore the impact of nature on wellbeing and learn evidence-based practices that can increase subjective happiness. We spent each day outside, visiting a different city park or going for short hikes in the surrounding area. One day that particularly stands out for me was the day we spent at Carkeek Park the day after the full moon/lunar eclipse so the tide was super low. We started our day with an abstract watercolor landscape painting of the Sound and Olympics and shared our work with a gallery walk. We then hiked through the wetland area to find a "sit spot" next to Piper Creek to make a sound map. A sound map is drawn in your field journal and you put yourself in the middle of the page and try to listen for as many sounds that you can and draw a representation or write a note about each sound you heard: birds chirping, wind blowing through leaves, children laughing, water running in the creek, dragonfly buzzing by, etc. We then had a discussion about ways we can thwart some of the annoying features of the mind that can get in the way of happiness. Finally, after lunch the tide was at its lowest point and we were able to meet with Seattle Aquarium guides to talk us through what creatures we were seeing on the beach. We practiced a field sketching technique called zoom in/zoom out where you sketch or paint the same object from different perspectives. Students were so excited to see barnacles feeding for the first time. Let me repeat, teenagers were excited to watch barnacles! For me, this was such a meaningful day because by that time during our second week together, we had bonded as a cohesive group and students no longer felt self-conscious about sitting in one place for a period of time and were mindfully aware of the nature around them and curious about their emotions or reactions to things rather than criticizing themselves. Our share outs were genuine and vulnerable by this point and our days were filled with a lot of laughter.

    What was one of the biggest expenses that the Happy Inside and Out Cascade took on last year? 
    There were two large expenses for our programming in this Cascade. Because we spent so much time field sketching and making art with nature, we had to buy roughly $800 in supplies for our 14 students. Secondly, we were lucky enough to engage with our community through a Forest Bathing experience with Cascadia Forest Therapy, animal tracking lesson with South Sound Forest School, a field sketching class with Seattle Audubon Society, and a meditation session with Kadampa Meditation Center.
     
    How did you come up with the topic? 
    This is the third iteration of the Cascade around happiness inside and out. Five years ago Chelsea and I did a mindfulness challenge together focusing on how hard winters are for mental health and wellbeing. 
  • Percy L. Abram Fund for Inclusion, Equity, and Justice

    This endowment fund was established in the midst of a global health pandemic and social justice uprising, both of which spotlight the deep-seeded racial inequities in the United States. It was also established six years into the tenure of Head of School Percy L. Abram for whom the fund is named. The Marcotte Solimano family has been inspired by his leadership, intellect, integrity, and authenticity - all critical traits to lead The Bush School in educating the next generation in service to lasting and just change.

    This fund supports diversity, equity, and inclusion programs, strategies, and curriculum and is intentionally designed to give Bush’s Head of School the discretion to identify relevant priorities that offer pathways to societal transformation.
    2020-2021 Anti-Racism and Racial Identity Speaker Series

    In 2020-2021, The Bush School was proud to partner with local independent schools to organize an Anti-Racism and Racial Identity Series. These virtual presentations and webinar discussions were facilitated by expert authors, organizers, and educators in the anti-racism space. 
    The speakers included:
    • Chris Crass: Challenging White Supremacy and Becoming Anti-Racist (Oct. 2020)
    • Farzana Nayani author of the new book Raising Multiracial Children: Tools for Nurturing Identity in a Racialized World (Dec. 2020)
    • Dr. Joy DeGruy: Historical Impact of Racism in Present Day America: The Illusion of Inclusion Webinar (Feb. 2021)
    • Tiq Milan: How We Queer Our Lives to be Free (Mar. 2021)
    • Ijeoma Oluo author of The New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk about Race (May 2021) 
    The Anti-Racism and Racial Identity Series addressed questions like: Are you wondering about how to talk to children about diverse topics such as race identity, culture, and more? What is a sensitive way to do it that is age-appropriate and comfortable for us adults? Learn how to support and nurture multiracial and multiethnic children and adults, while incorporating allyship and an anti-racism approach that addresses key issues.
     
    The Anti-Racism Speaker Series, now called the Virtual Equity & Inclusion Speaker Series, was organized by local independent schools in 2020-2021 and has continued in the 2021-2022 school year. The schools that joined together to fund and produce the events in its first year were Eastside Catholic, Evergreen School, Forest Ridge, Lakeside School, Overlake School, Seattle Country Day, The Bush School, The Meridian School, University Prep, and Villa Academy. The Speaker Series has now grown to include schools of every kind from all over the Pacific Northwest.
  • Person Family Music Endowment

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 2009 by Mina Brechemin Person ’64 in honor of the Person family. Income from The Person Family Music Endowment provides support for the music program at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Jill Wangsgard, Upper School Music Teacher

    How long have you been at Bush?
    21 years, and full time since 2006 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to the music department in the last school year?
    Broken Records (The Bush School’s student-run music production group) put on three virtual venues, with tons of student musicians recording and mixing on their computers. The students write 85-100 songs each year and make and sell merchandise. In 2020-2021, one of the virtual Venue themes was Camp Venue, and the students made video sketches around a campfire to introduce each of the electronic songs that were played on the livestream.  The next hybrid Venue is December 10, 2021. 

    What was the biggest expense for Venue last year?
    Last year we paid two alumni to help with Venue. They were so generous with their time and everything they put in. Caleb Stein ‘15 mastered the whole soundtrack with the visuals made by students, and they really helped to make digital Venue a success.  

    Additional Comments
    Your own work, composition, creativity, gives you the freedom to be free and move in whatever way you want to move and be creative, that mindset is what makes the music department and Bush special.  
  • Ragen Family Scholarship Fund

    This permanently restricted endowment fund was established in 2006 by Brooks and Suzanne Ragen to support financial aid at The Bush School. Funds will be awarded annually to an applicant or existing student whose scholarship, aptitude, and potential leadership skills suggest that the student would be a productive member of The Bush School and the Seattle communities. Monies will be made available from the fund every year according to the school’s endowment spending policy.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Robert S. Corkran Wilderness Endowment Fund

    This endowed fund was established through the gifts of many alumni and friends of The Bush School on the occasion of Rob Corkran’s retirement in the spring of 2006. Income from the fund provides support for the operating costs of the school’s wilderness program, including but not limited to financial support for students who cannot otherwise afford to participate in wilderness trips, equipment, and other operating expenses.
    Q&A with Erik Gearhart, Eighth Grade History Teacher
     
    Years at Bush 
    Fifteen
     
    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience in the last school year?
    Last year for the San Juan Sea Kayaking E-week was the first time all year that kids got to take their masks off and run around together, invent games, and more importantly socialize with other students and teachers. These trips are the best way to get to know the students, especially in Covid times. Not being able to have these trips for almost a whole year meant I didn't get to know my kids the way I usually do. We went to fourteen different islands in the San Juans and it was a sixteen day expedition full of camping, cooking meals, and navigating. We saw a lot of porpoises, sea lions, harbor seals, and magnificent sunsets. Kids had to dig deep, it's a long time away from home, and long days, including a sixteen mile day. 
     
    What was one of the biggest expenses that experiential programs took on last year? 
    Bush owns its own fleet of kayaks, each one costing about $5,000-$6,000. We originally received the fleet from a philanthropic gift. The kayak fleet requires repair and maintenance costs that are an additional cost each year. Other expenses included Personal Floatation Devices (PFDs) and wetsuits. 

    Additional Comments
    A lot of independent schools have outdoor programs, but one of the things that distinguishes the programs at Bush is that they are designed and led by Bush faculty, which ties back to Bush academics and creates camaraderie amongst students and faculty to make it more connected to campus. We use a lot fewer outside contractors at Bush, and we have a faculty who love to teach experientially. We are weaving in curriculum to the outdoor classroom environment, and truly allowing students to experience education. 
     
    A story from February 29, 2020 while on the Joshua Tree Climbing and Mojave Desert Studies program, one of our Middle School Wilderness trips we offer throughout the year:

    This trip is a seven-day program of immersive lessons on geology, biology, public lands, and outdoor education. 
     
    We departed for that trip in a world that was quickly changing. We didn't know how much, though, until we started our journey back home. As our van full of beaming students and tired teachers headed down the mountains to catch a plane back to Seattle, our cell phones started lighting up with urgent messages from our school counselor, Gayle Gingold. The emerging pandemic had gotten much worse, she said, and we should be very careful with washing our hands and avoiding contacting surfaces on the plane. 
     
    We couldn't know it at the time, but that trip was to become the last overnight off-campus program Bush would run for over a year. 
  • Ryan Family Endowment for Drama

    This permanently restricted fund was established in 1988 by John and Sally Ryan and their sons, Jeff ’91, Will ’93, and Ben ’97. Additional contributions were received in Sally’s memory following her death in 1999. Income from the Ryan Family Endowment for Drama provides support for the Theater Program at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Hilary Moore, Upper School Drama Teacher

    Years at Bush 
    2020-2021 was my first year teaching at Bush, but I am also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to the theater department in the last school year?
    Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.

    What was the biggest expense for the theater department last year?
    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm. 
  • Sally Abbott Kitchell '68 Memorial Endowment

    Established in Sally's memory, its income is used for the enrichment of arts and literature at Bush by bringing individuals distinguished in those fields to lecture at the school, either to the students during the day or to evening gatherings of the larger community. 
  • Sheffield and Patricia Phelps Fund

    Sheffield and Patricia Phelps established this permanently restricted fund in 1977 to support the student financial aid program. Shef Phelps was a member of the Board of Trustees from 1959 to 1975. Additional contributions were received in Patty’s memory following her death in 1990.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund

    The Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund was established in honor of Sis Pease’s retirement from the Board of Trustees in 2007. Income from this permanently restricted fund provides support for student financial aid. The generous contributions to the Sis Pease Endowed Financial Aid Fund, have provided a legacy that honors the work of Sis Pease at The Bush School. This fund has received a multitude of gifts from Board members, faculty, parents, and alumni.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • Technology Endowment Fund

    This fund was created with funds contributed to the 2001: A Bush Odyssey Fund-an-Item by parents, faculty, staff, alumnae/i, and other friends to support the use of technology at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Chandru Narayan, Upper School Technology Faculty
    How long have you been at Bush? 
    3 years 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Technology and Innovation in the last school year?
    The students captured a whirlpool galaxy image with the telescope. It was midnight on the turf field, and we had invited faculty and parents to watch the image capture on a monitor. The joint celebration with the students and also the other faculty and parents that had assembled, was a very special moment. Human beings evolved to connect with the universe, by connecting the two, there's tremendous power in teaching and learning. The fact that the students obtained the image is special, because it’s quite different from googling a telescope image because they were the ones who captured it. It's one thing to show the spectrum of oxygen on the internet, it's another to do it on a device you built. Simply getting the image was great, and then getting the data and discussing it brought everything together. 
      
    What was one of the biggest expenses that the program took on last year? 
    The telescope and accessories, by far, eclipsed everything else. A telescope costs roughly $8,000, and there are additional accessories needed. 

    About the M51 - Whirlpool Galaxy
    The Whirlpool Galaxy 23 Million Light Years away is interacting with another small irregular galaxy. It is about 1/2 the size of our own Milky Way about 40,000 light years in diameter. Its plentiful bright blue and young stars dot its spiral arms. This image was obtained by the telescope after 90-minutes of the telescope staring at the exact same point in the sky!
    For more information, check out The Bush Telescope’s website: 
    https://www.thebushtelescope.com/#h.mb8qtqplvkjd
  • The Dylan Young '88 Fund for Possibility

    Established in 2015 to provide financial aid to students with physical limitations. Dylan Young '88 trained and competed in wheelchair track and won a gold medal in the 1988 Seoul Paralympics, going on to compete in wheelchair rugby, tennis, crew, and sailing.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • The Endowment Fund for Financial Aid

    The Financial Aid Fund was established in 2015. The generous contributions to the Financial Aid Fund are permanently restricted to support student financial aid at The Bush School.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • The Frank Magusin Head of School Discretionary Endowment Fund

    The Frank Magusin Head of School Discretionary Endowment Fund was established in 2013 to honor the legacy of Frank Magusin who served as Head of School from 2000 to 2014. Income from this fund is allocated at the discretion of the current Head of School, enabling the Head of School to make targeted investments in new and innovative programs and to direct support to areas that further The Bush School’s mission.
    Head of School Priorities 2020-2021 School Year
    Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.
    Head of School | The Bush School
     
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2020-2021  school year, we focused on three areas in particular: Experiential programs and the Methow Campus, Performing Arts, and Faculty and Staff professional development. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. 
     
    Experiential Programs featuring the Bush Methow Campus
    The Bush Methow campus is a resource to both The Bush School and the Methow Valley community. We strive to find more ways to connect with the community and to serve the community in that capacity as a resource. Right now, we are really listening and in conversation with members of the community to ensure any progress made with our programs are meaningful and collaborative. 
    There's a sense of quiet and reflection that you can achieve there that helps to create transformative educational experiences. The campus is in a really special place along the Methow river and among the oldest stands of cedar trees in the state. There are trails and the goat wall (climbing rock) and it's just a place to be contemplative. 

    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 

    Performing Arts featuring the Theater Program 
    Upper School Drama Teacher Hilary Moore started working at Bush during the pandemic, but she is not new to the school, she is also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    One of her most significant moments with the theater department last year included the production of Twelfth Night. Of the experience she shared, “Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.
    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm.”
     
    Faculty & Staff Professional Development
    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."
    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.
  • The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus

    In memory of Ian Fair, The Bush School and Ian’s loving family and friends have established The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus. To honor Ian’s vision and dedication, the Fund supports the integration of wilderness, cultural, and immersive experiential learning for students of The Bush School and the Methow Valley. Ian envisioned a unique and powerful opportunity for students from the east and west sides of the Cascades to engage with and learn from one another in the magic of the Methow Valley – a place Ian cherished and called home. Those involved with the program will carry forth his vision and infectious enthusiasm for teaching, the community, and the great outdoors. In his role as program coordinator, Ian was hired to launch an experiential and project-based curriculum on the new campus. Ian was the perfect partner to build bridges, generate big ideas, and share the beauty and wonder of the places and people of the Methow Valley. With passion, experience, and a generous heart, Ian immediately connected with students, colleagues, and the community to pave the way for a program to deliver on the school’s bold promise of sparking in students of diverse backgrounds and talents a passion for learning, accomplishment, and contribution to their communities.
    The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus
    Hilary Kaltenbach
    Methow Campus Program Manager | The Bush School
     
    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School whose tuition was paid through The Ian Fair Fund for the Methow Campus.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 
  • The Russell and Melonee Horowitz Scholarship Endowment

    Russell and Melonee Horowitz and their children Melañia '22 and Mila have established The Russell and Melonee Horowitz Scholarship Fund in March of 2014, as a commitment to making a Bush School education accessible to students regardless of their financial circumstances.
    Q&A with Adam Choice, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

    Years at Bush 
    This is my third year at Bush 

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    Beyond the $4 million financial aid budget for the 2020-2021 school year, we had a secondary Financial Aid Program budget of $300,000 for additional costs outside of tuition. Families receive financial aid support to offset the cost of additional educational components like laptops, textbooks, tutoring, and food in the Commons. In 2020-2021, with many Bush students learning remotely, this included sending home grocery store gift cards throughout the year to around 40 families. The gift cards were new in 2020-2021, and were distributed to help support the changing needs for families impacted most by the pandemic. 

    What was the biggest expense for Financial Aid last year?
    Learning support services which encompases tutoring, educational evaluations, sometimes therapy, and occupational/speech therapy, were the largest expense within the financial aid budget. Learning support services in particular represented about half of our expenditure last year. These are important because learning support services give students the tools they need to thrive at Bush and beyond. 

    Additional comments 
    We are continuing to do equity work and improve the Financial Aid Program. I am proud of the changes we’ve implemented to make financial aid more accessible and available to families who need it. And there is always more work to do. Two years ago when the pandemic first started, Bush provided temporary financial aid relief ($175,000) for tuition to 23 students. These commitments have continued into the 2021-2022 school year to help families keep their students enrolled and supported by the school.
  • The Simon and Max Kreielsheimer Endowment Fund

    This was created when The Kreielsheimer Foundation awarded a grant to the School's General Endowment fund. Max and Simon Kreielsheimer attended Bush from 1948 to 1955; their youngest sister, Olivia, joined them when she entered Kindergarten in 1949 and was a student during the 1950's. The Fund's unrestricted purpose is to support the mission of The Bush School.
    Head of School Priorities 2020-2021 School Year
    Percy L. Abram, Ph.D.
    Head of School | The Bush School
     
    Each year, the Head of School’s Office and the Senior Leadership Team set curricular priorities for the school. In the 2020-2021  school year, we focused on three areas in particular: Experiential programs and the Methow Campus, Performing Arts, and Faculty and Staff professional development. What follows are stories about these foci that were supported by your philanthropy. 
     
    Experiential Programs featuring the Bush Methow Campus
    The Bush Methow campus is a resource to both The Bush School and the Methow Valley community. We strive to find more ways to connect with the community and to serve the community in that capacity as a resource. Right now, we are really listening and in conversation with members of the community to ensure any progress made with our programs are meaningful and collaborative. 
    There's a sense of quiet and reflection that you can achieve there that helps to create transformative educational experiences. The campus is in a really special place along the Methow river and among the oldest stands of cedar trees in the state. There are trails and the goat wall (climbing rock) and it's just a place to be contemplative. 

    In the 2020-2021 school year, programming at the Methow Campus had to be reenvisioned, as was the case with other areas of experiential learning through the COVID-19 pandemic.
     
    Part of our work on the Methow Valley Elementary Family and Community Engagement committee in 2020-2021 was to address equity of access to summer camps and other out-of-school opportunities.  With the shift of many organizations to online registration, there was a very real barrier for families who didn’t have reliable internet access, in addition to the cost of these programs.  Working with the Counselor and English Language Learner Liaison at Liberty Bell High School, we pre-registered seven students for summer camps at The Bush School.  They enrolled in Art in Nature, Fly-fishing, and Orienteering with amazing instructors.   
     
    Not only did these seven students have experiences that introduced them to new skills and strengths, the camps was richer due to their presence. 

    Performing Arts featuring the Theater Program 
    Upper School Drama Teacher Hilary Moore started working at Bush during the pandemic, but she is not new to the school, she is also an alumna from the class of 2010. 

    One of her most significant moments with the theater department last year included the production of Twelfth Night. Of the experience she shared, “Pulling together Twelfth Night was a challenging and beautiful feat for everyone involved. The amount of creativity that was brought forth by the whole team of students was so exciting, and together we created a show that had virtual students acting on stage with in-person students (which included six TV screens built into the set), and then live-streamed the whole performance to audiences at home.
    In order to put on Twelfth Night, we needed an immense amount of tech which ended up being by far our biggest expense. Cameras, wireless mics, and other AV equipment needed to be rented or bought for the show. Additionally, we commissioned local playwright Hannah Merrill (also a Bush Alum) to write a play for the department last Spring which we will now be performing this Fall. “The Memory Eaters” opens November 10th at 7:00pm.”
     
    Faculty & Staff Professional Development
    In the 2020-2021 school year $100,000 was spent on Faculty and Staff Professional Development. While many forms of professional development looked different, there was an added emphasis on the new ways to engage our students while teaching through the pandemic. 
    In discussing professional development at Bush, Assistant Head of School for Academics Sarah Smith shared, "Professional development happens in areas that are both school-wide priorities and/or topics reflecting a teacher's individual desire for growth. Teachers can apply for funding to help deepen their knowledge or expertise in the areas that impact their classroom practice the most."
    Faculty and staff participated in virtual professional development courses including:
    • Assessment and grading practices
    • Trauma informed responsiveness
    • Math and reading literacy
    • Anti-racism and anti-bias training
    • People of Color Conference and Student Diversity Leadership Conference through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
    • Courses offered through Independent Schools Experiential Education Network (ISEEN) around professional affinity spaces, sustainability initiatives, leadership development, and classroom pedagogy
    Providing these opportunities for faculty and staff strengthens their skills and knowledge, supporting them in producing curriculum that keeps pace with the developing needs of students here at Bush.
  • Wang-Zhu Chinese Language Program Fund for Mandarin Studies

    Established in September, 2020 the purpose of The Wang-Zhu Chinese Language Program Fund for Mandarin Studies is to support the Middle School and Upper School Mandarin language programs for at least the next 10 years at The Bush School. The goal of a comprehensive Mandarin program is to provide students the opportunity to study throughout their Middle School and Upper School years, gaining an appreciation and proficiency of the language and culture.
    Q&A with Yaqi Bick, Middle School Mandarin Faculty

    Years at Bush 
    Six years

    Can you share and reflect on a meaningful moment or experience related to Financial Aid in the last school year?
    While we all experienced challenges due to COVID-19, our team of administrators, faculty, and staff worked well to ensure that we provided quality education while helping students face and overcome the obstacles thrown at them. Fortunately, with the funding for the Mandarin program at Bush, we were able to obtain the wonderful reading resources (iChinesereader.com) for both Upper School and Middle School students. These reading resources not only provided the much needed support for the content we studied in class, but also included “demo reading”: picture books with audio recording. These provided a much needed resource that was tailored for individual learning needs. We have students who read over 300 books in the short period of time online and they are still working on them every day! Furthermore, funding was able to aid much needed assistance for cultural activities in classrooms once we were able to return to campus early spring. Middle School students were able to experience Chinese culture through activities such as calligraphy (pictured to the right), creating spring couplets for Chinese New Year, learning ink-art in landscape painting, and Taichi practice with Shifu (Master) Tianyuan Li! 

    What was the biggest expense for the Mandarin program last year?
    iChinesereader and paid membership services for liveworksheets, wizer.me, and Wordwall.com along with supplies for Mandarin classrooms. These are highly used tools that enabled students' differentiated learning both inside and outside the classroom. 

    Additional comments

    Your support has lifted the Bush community's spirits and became a great example to counter the rhetoric and hate against Asians and Asian culture that we witnessed and experienced last year. The classroom experiences we were able to provide would not have been possible without your support! I can not say enough to express my immense gratitude towards your generosity! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
  • Wyman Family Endowment Fund

    The Wyman family, including Ann (Chi Chi) ’64, Deehan (Dee) ’65, and Virginia ’67, established this endowment in 1998 as a memorial to their sister Helen (Class of 1966). Income from The Wyman Family Endowment Fund provides support for maintenance and improvement of the lower campus.
    Campus Improvements in the Lower School 2020-2021
    Ken Longfellow 
    Director of Facilities | The Bush School
    • Replaced carpet in Classroom Room 211
    • Scrubbed and polished Schuchart Gym floor
    • Replaced and repaired window blinds
    • Various patching and painting across the Lower School
    • Replaced roof on Library and Schuchart Gym
    • Replaced furnaces in Schuchart Gym
    • Upgraded surveillance system to a new Avigilon server, upgraded added and relocated cameras
    • Replaced failed actuator valves in Lower School HVAC systems
    • Replaced rubber bumpers around Lower School playground
    • Removed linoleum from LS 2nd floor restrooms – ground and polished concrete
    • Sealed south parking garage wall by injecting epoxy in cracks to stop water leak damage – painted exit door to E Harrison Street
    • Signage and floor stickers to help students maintain social distance while walking through campus 

Contact Us

Thank you for visiting this page. If you have any questions, please reach out to the Bush Development Office at development@bush.edu.